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I did some rewiring recently and took the opportunity to organized the main panel so that the breakers are arranged more logically and the conductors are much neater instead of the tangled mess it was. In the process of moving the breakers around I end up with two #12 and one #14 neutral conductors not long enough to reach the desired slot in the neutral bus bar.

I know I can extend each individual conductors with a spliced connection inside the panel and be done with it, and that's what I have done. However, I was wondering, could I have combined all three neutral conductors together and spliced it with a single say #6 white conductor and connector that to the bus bar instead? If this is a no no, why?

Thanks in advance!
 

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...However, I was wondering, could I have combined all three neutral conductors together and spliced it with a single say #6 white conductor and connector that to the bus bar instead? If this is a no no, why?...
That is questionable. Technically you can't put more than one neutral in a neutral bar slot. Combining three and splicing together to one jumper and then placing that jumper to one slot in the neutral bar I think would be open to interpretation to an electrical inspector. Taking each individual neutral, adding/splicing an extension of the same size required conductor then taking that extension to a slot in the neutral bar is the proper way to go and would not draw questionable interpretation.

Also, cant think off the top of my head but combining the three individuals to one spliced on jumper you are technically (I could be wrong on this and some please correct me if I am) sharing neutrals from different circuits. Even if the jumper is sized higher it may still be considered sharing neutrals. And may be open to an electrical inspectors interpretation.

Again, just thoughts I am throwing out there. I could be wrong but interesting question.
 

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Very Stable Genius
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It's not a good idea as it removes the ability to work on 1 cct without also turning
off other ccts. Specifically, when someone later on wants to remove just one
of those neutrals they can't do so as they would if it were terminated by itself
in the neutral bar.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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It is a code violation of NEC 200.4A

Installation. Neutral conductors shall not be used for more than one branch circuit, for more than one multiwire branch circuit, or for more than one set of ungrounded feeder conductors unless specifically permitted elsewhere in this Code.
 
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