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Hi folks. I recently purchased a Durkopp Adler 558 keyhole buttonhole sewing machine and it currently has a dual shaft 220v triple phase motor powering it. I contacted Durkopp Adler about switching the motor to a 110v, but they were only interested in upselling me. I was told that I would not be able to switch out the motor with a 110v, and my only option would be to replace the motor with a single phase 220v and use a step up transformer.

Is there any way I can replace the motor without going their route? I assumed I could purchase a dual shaft 110v motor with the same specs as the current motor.


Any help and advice is highly appreciated.


Thanks
 

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Hi folks. I recently purchased a Durkopp Adler 558 keyhole buttonhole sewing machine and it currently has a dual shaft 220v triple phase motor powering it. I contacted Durkopp Adler about switching the motor to a 110v, but they were only interested in upselling me. I was told that I would not be able to switch out the motor with a 110v, and my only option would be to replace the motor with a single phase 220v and use a step up transformer.

Is there any way I can replace the motor without going their route? I assumed I could purchase a dual shaft 110v motor with the same specs as the current motor.


Any help and advice is highly appreciated.


Thanks
no pictures of the motor ? just take the motor off and go to a motor place and match it up , can't offer more
 

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Switching from a 3 phase to a single phase, it needs to stay at 240v.
 

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Theoretically you could switch out a single phase or 3 phase 220 to 240 volt motor for a single phase or 3 phase 110 to 120 volt motor but it is possible you could not find a single phase 120 volt motor with adequate (horse)power.

For starters you need a motor with about the same wattage (or HP) unless you know the existing motor is oversized. (One HP equals about 750 watts.) And you want the same RPM (speed) otherwise the machine's adjustable speeds may lack some of the lower speeds or lack some of the higher speeds you expect. The 120 volt circuit must be sized and breakered appropriately.
 

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The existing motor is very likely 50HZ meaning that replacing it with a 60HZ model would make it turn faster. The machine might not be able to handle the faster motor.

Further, I doubt a single phase replacement would be easy to find, it sounds like some sort of a special frame.

The easiest way here may very well be to use a VFD with single phase input. All VFDs output 3ø and if the motor is 3HP or smaller this would likely be less expensive than a single phase motor.

Rob
 

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Is there any way I can replace the motor without going their route? I assumed I could purchase a dual shaft 110v motor with the same specs as the current motor. Thanks

Take the existing motor to a local motor shop and you should be able
to find a single phase 120v motor to replace it.
Its only a small half horse,
All the relivent specs are on the name plate.
the harderst part will be matching shaft sizes and the mountings.
But it is possible.
 

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yep, what he said.


look online for flexible shaft couplers so you can go between two different size shafts. if that fails, go to your local machine shop and ask them to fab you a spline.
 
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