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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to extend the coaxial cable in my family room to go across the hall into my living room. I don't want to have to fool with replacing what's there so I'm going to use a female-to-female coupler and just join the old cable with the new.

I intend to buy about 250 ft of RG6 coax cable and just cut it to the length I need. This means I'll have to cut the end off and replace it. Could someone please recommend the tools required to do this? Ideally, I'd like something simple and easy. Since I'm a novice, it should also be foolproof, if such a thing exists.

Also, does anyone knows of a website that has a good tutorial with pictures? I came across a few, but they contradicted each other and left me slightly confused.

I'd also appreciate recommendations on good brands of coax cable and the connectors. Is Lowe's and Home Depot usually the best place to buy the things I'll need, particularly the coax cable?

Oh, I'd really like white coax cable since it will blend in better as it's run across the hallway. If I can't find white, is it ok to paint parts of it white with spray paint?

Thanks in advance for the help. I want to make sure everything goes smoothly (it never does) and I don't trust my own judgement with what to buy.
 

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If you Google "twist on coax connectors" you will find some videos that show how to do this without the crimping tool.

Bud
 

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They each have their place. I have the crimping tool but our company used mostly twist-on as they were easy to check in the field. When problems arrive a twist-on can be easily removed and reinstalled. A crimp on must be cut off and a new connector installed, tool and connector not always on everyone's truck. As for reliability, I have installed several thousand of them and replaced hundreds of crimp-ons that other vendors had installed. The few failures we did run into were mostly associated with someone tripping over a cable, often because the desks were moved and they never protected the cables correctly.

The biggest problem will be finding the right size for the coax you are using, not typically a HD item.

Bud
 

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I use this stripper...it is a one-step tool and it is completely idiot-proof. I've tried different kinds and this is my fave. Twist 5 times and pull. Done.

Klein Tools VDV110061 Coax Cable Stripper - 2-Level, Radial https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004SUVEIA/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_2sj0wbCYV1WG3


I prefer compression and use this...have never had any problems.

Klein Tools VDV212-008-SEN Compact F-Connector Compression Crimper https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002KWZCR2/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_Gxj0wbE9YSCP4

My local Lowe's sells only Ideal brand. Our Home Depot does Klein.

IMO,...I have great success with the Klein "universal" F-connectors...they take RG6 and Quad. I know Amazon sells a kit with all that I described
for basic DIY.
 

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@Oso, boy, that takes me way back.

Is the difference you are referring to that the crimp on uses a pin crimped to the center conductor along with crimping the braid to the barrel. Where the compression only fastens a collar around the braid.

In any case, they both require a special tool, not really cost effective for a home owner connecting a couple of cables.

Bud
 

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Compression connectors are pretty much the best all-around, but they do require a special tool which is not cheap. The twist-ons are pretty decent in general and require no special tools. Since you're only doing this once I'd recommend the twist-ons. You can paint the cable any color you want but white cable is available in every common variety so there's no real need to do that. Painting a cable of any significant length is actually harder than it seems, since it's round and you have to cover all sides. Just get some white RG6 (quad-shield preferably) and a bag of twist-on F connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the help.

In regards to those compression tools like the Klein one, how hard would it be for an 11 y/o boy to use? I'm wondering if he'd have the hand strength necessary to use it. My cousin wants to help me, so I figured I'd let him. It'll sure be a refreshing change from him sitting in front of the computer for hours and hours.
 

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blu878 said:
Thanks for the help. In regards to those compression tools like the Klein one, how hard would it be for an 11 y/o boy to use? I'm wondering if he'd have the hand strength necessary to use it. My cousin wants to help me, so I figured I'd let him. It'll sure be a refreshing change from him sitting in front of the computer for hours and hours.
Hardly any pressure...only moves maybe 1/4". The "hard part" is getting the connector all the way on up to the dielectric, by hand...right before compressing.
 

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I use this stripper...it is a one-step tool and it is completely idiot-proof. I've tried different kinds and this is my fave. Twist 5 times and pull. Done.

Klein Tools VDV110061 Coax Cable Stripper - 2-Level, Radial https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004SUVEIA/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_2sj0wbCYV1WG3


I prefer compression and use this...have never had any problems.

Klein Tools VDV212-008-SEN Compact F-Connector Compression Crimper https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002KWZCR2/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_Gxj0wbE9YSCP4

My local Lowe's sells only Ideal brand. Our Home Depot does Klein.

IMO,...I have great success with the Klein "universal" F-connectors...they take RG6 and Quad. I know Amazon sells a kit with all that I described
for basic DIY.
I'll vouch for all the items in this post. Exactly what I use and have no complaints.
How hard is it to rerun the whole cable? If it's getting your 11yo to crawl under the house it could be a good experience for him.
You'll want some right sized straps too of course. I believe T25 is the right size for a staple gun or pick up a bag of the plastic U shaped single nail type when you buy the coax. Quad shield coax and connectors are recommended.
 
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