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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day to you all.

I need to heat up my aquarium using a heater with a thermostat. So I bought a 'Rainbow TS-120S' thermostat to control the temperature. Now I am a bit confused with the circuitry involving the heater, thermostat, and power supply.

Here's a link to the thermostat I bought:
http://www.rainbowelec.co.kr/english/product/capillary-thermostat.html
http://www.siaminstrument.com/index.php?lay=show&ac=cat_show_pro_detail&cid=20288&pid=81592

Through research I found out that the thermostat is a SPDT and came up with this diagram, but the thing is I am not sure if it is correct. Please tell, me if this diagram is correct or incorrect, how to correct it and such. Any help would be of great help.

Thanks.

 

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Registered
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Good day to you all.

I need to heat up my aquarium using a heater with a thermostat. So I bought a 'Rainbow TS-120S' thermostat to control the temperature. Now I am a bit confused with the circuitry involving the heater, thermostat, and power supply.

Here's a link to the thermostat I bought:
http://www.rainbowelec.co.kr/english/product/capillary-thermostat.html
http://www.siaminstrument.com/index.php?lay=show&ac=cat_show_pro_detail&cid=20288&pid=81592

Through research I found out that the thermostat is a SPDT and came up with this diagram, but the thing is I am not sure if it is correct. Please tell, me if this diagram is correct or incorrect, how to correct it and such. Any help would be of great help.

Thanks.

More detail will help. First up what is wattage of heater, Volt amps required, how big is the aquarium...etc. A spdt does not seem to be the correct approach here unless the heater is a dual heat application. Looks like the equipment is DC powered (from an adapter?) Why not use a test tube heater that plugs into a standard receptacle? Would be a lot cheaper.
 

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Your diagram will work (you may or may not need to reverse 1 and 2, though), but it's unnecessarily complicated. Usually you would connect the incoming power supply to the common terminal on the thermostat, then connect the heater to whichever of the other terminals (1 or 2) is hot when the thermostat is below the set point. The other terminal on the thermostat doesn't need to be connected to anything.
 
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