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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello

I live in Manitoba , Canada and have owned my house for 11 years . House was built in 86 . This huge crack has been developing in my basement and i would like some advice before i call a local foundation company .

The crack runs the length of the house and in spots are a half in wide . I have measured the depth of the crack at about 5 inches . The right wall in the pictures has a few odd readings , in the corner it moving to the right and in the middle of the wall it seems to be moving to the left and then back to level in the front corner . Please see pictures i would be greatful for any advice .
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just wanted to add that the above picture of the wall is about the middle of wall running the length of the entire house. Thank You
 

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Hello

Thanks for replying , the wall I am talking about is on the right side of the photos I posted . I will add a picture of the wall .

The picture of the wall you posted appears to be of drywall,but that floor looks to be in pretty bad shape, i'd suggest you get a structual engineer in to find out what's going on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hello

Thank You for your reply . Would you know anyone online that that could comment on this issue i am having . The crack in the drywall is very odd , it starts from one side of the stud and changes sides to the other . Like a corkscrew affect .
 

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Hello

Thank You for your reply . Would you know anyone online that that could comment on this issue i am having . The crack in the drywall is very odd , it starts from one side of the stud and changes sides to the other . Like a corkscrew affect .
Based on the limited information you've provided, my suggestion is to go ahead and contact your local foundation contractor. Be very selective about who will do the repair. The simple fact that you are faced with this problem is the resolution will be costly.

It is only my opinion that the ground is slipping away from underneath the slab. The separation of 5 inches (wide or deep) is very excessive and requires much attention. My educated guess is that after another 5 years, you would have a house that has collapsed and, then, the conversation would be totally different. As for the drywall seam separation... it's a small part of your problem and should straighten itself (figuratively speaking) once after the foundation problem is repaired.

One point here also to make is that, normally speaking, property insurance policies don't cover landslides...

Good luck.
 

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If you have neighbors nearby, ask them to see if they have any foundation issues.

Also, that crack looks like it was sealed before with some type of caulking. Did you do that and if yes, when?

OOdssoo, just a minor correction in that the crack was 5 inches deep, not 5 inches wide.

Either way, I am not sure if that house is safe.
 

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If you have neighbors nearby, ask them to see if they have any foundation issues.

Also, that crack looks like it was sealed before with some type of caulking. Did you do that and if yes, when?

OOdssoo, just a minor correction in that the crack was 5 inches deep, not 5 inches wide.

Either way, I am not sure if that house is safe.

Uncertain to me of the code requirement on the thickness of this house, 5 inches deep IS very serious! And honestly, 5 inches wide would be more serious of an crack!

Agreed.... Either way, get something done ASAP! Don't live in it in the mean time!
 

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First off, I do foundation repairs as part of my profession, and I can tell you that it's darn near impossible to try to successfully troubleshoot issues accurately over the internet or from a few pics. It's a big enough challenge trying to troubleshoot the actual issue in person much less with such limited information.

The one thing that does instantly stand out as a red-flag to me though is the dampness around the cracks in the floor. This is typically an indication of high ground water, and more often than not, a good indicator that the sump pump (presuming you have on in a sump crock) is failing...........
 

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First off, I do foundation repairs as part of my profession, and I can tell you that it's darn near impossible to try to successfully troubleshoot issues accurately over the internet or from a few pics. It's a big enough challenge trying to troubleshoot the actual issue in person much less with such limited information.

The one thing that does instantly stand out as a red-flag to me though is the dampness around the cracks in the floor. This is typically an indication of high ground water, and more often than not, a good indicator that the sump pump (presuming you have on in a sump crock) is failing...........

To further the point, if the pump system is failing, the ground under the slab may be washing away....

Bottom line, the point is clear here... get a professional to look at it in person. Get an engineer also to look at it...

Good luck!
 

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Just wanted to wish you luck,dd. From looks of things, seems the rising ground water has turned Manitoba halfway to upside down. I had the same problem the other day. Vertical or "portrait" oriented pics in my file were oriented fine, when I up loaded and previewed, fine; when I posted they were all flipped 90 degrees.
 
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