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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't worked on air compressors before, so need some help, please.

I have an old Campell Hausfield 2hp, 4 gallon twin tank air compressor. It cycles on at 90 psi and cycles off at 125 psi.

The 35 psi difference in pressure does not work well for my nail guns. I took off the plastic case on the controls and there only seems to be one adjustment screw (it's a funky screw, kind of star shaped with a bump in the middle. When I tighten it (using a needle nose pliers to turn the sides), it increases both the cut in and cut out pressure simultaneously, i.e., it will move up the cut in pressure to 95 and the cut out pressure to 130. Ideally I'd like to have it cycle on at 100 or a bit higher and cycle off at 125.

Even though it says it is a 125 psi max air compressor, is it dangerous if I set it to go over the 125? Seems like, with the range it's working at, I'd need to set it at cut in of 100 and cut out at 145 and then use the regulator for my nailer's max pressure.

Speaking of regulators, I just bought a new one from Northern Tool. It is an Ironton model, it has one male threaded end and one female end, but it doesn't have an arrow or directions to show which is the inlet and which is the outlet. Any idea which one is the inlet? I wasn't crazy about buying Northern tool's generic Ironton model ... is there a better, more reliable regulator that you recommend?

Thanks much for the help regarding both questions!
 

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Some pressure switches have a separate screw for adjusting the differential, and some do not; apparently yours does not, so yes, as you increase or decrease the cut-in pressure the cut-out pressure follows suit. Being a single stage unit, the efficiency max's out at about 120, and will drop significantly as you crank it up, causing it to take longer to recover.
 

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That compressor should run a nail gun efficiently. Now, IF you are a framing contractor who shoots two to three nail per second, then NO. Check your air hose size. Most nail guns require at least 3/8" inside diameter hoses. When you shoot one nail, say a 16d, you will use up all the air within a 3/8" I.D. air hose x 25 ft. long @ 90 PSI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That compressor should run a nail gun efficiently. Now, IF you are a framing contractor who shoots two to three nail per second, then NO. Check your air hose size. Most nail guns require at least 3/8" inside diameter hoses. When you shoot one nail, say a 16d, you will use up all the air within a 3/8" I.D. air hose x 25 ft. long @ 90 PSI.
Thanks for the info and advice everyone. You're right, I just checked the specs on my framing nailer and it says it operates at pressure of 70-120. I assumed it was a higher minimum setting. I was having problems with toe-nailing some 3" framing nails a while back with a new Porter Cable framing nailer that was set to max depth. Some nail heads would get fully embedded, and some would stick out. I do have a 3/8" hose, but it is 100 feet long. :smile:

I had to replace my regulator because it was no longer adjustable, but seemed like it was set (stuck) right around 100 when I was using that nailer.

Anyone have advice on the new regulator I bought as mentioned in the first post? I have the air coming in the female side and the air going out of the male side ... it has no arrow on it showing which way it should be installed. Doesn't seem to work at all as I have it installed now. I'll have to buy some different fittings if I want to reverse it, so just wanted to get some advice before going through the trouble of switching it around.
 

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i adjust mine to kick in at 100 psi and out at 130 psi. ive adjusted to 135 in the past without any problems, but have learned that it isnt needed and will just put more stress on everything, but to answer your question, more than likely not going to to any damage.
 

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The pressure relief valve limit defines the maximum "safe" setting of cutout pressure. My compressor is set to cut out 10 psi below the PRV psi. Make sure your relief valve works before relying on it. The tank and fittings have a higher safe capacity.
 
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