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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Next project guys: The back porch foundation on this house is about as bad if not worse than the front porch. The cellar opens up to the back yard underneath the back porch on this property, these pictures are taken underneath.

http://s772.photobucket.com/user/mb...tion/IMG_0345_zpswkh3ag9s.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0

http://s772.photobucket.com/user/mb...tion/IMG_0344_zpsesy4twr0.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1

The only two supports other than a wooden support added a few years ago are those two made from brick. They are starting to sag and come apart in some areas and just don't seem very sturdy to me. My thought is to remove the cinder block walls beneath them (obviously after bracing the porch and removing the brick) and then replace those walls but build new cinder block columns from the bottom of the new walls up to the porch floor.

In simpler words basically instead of having the supports resting on the wall (is this even ok?) I would build new pillars that rest directly on the ground with the walls built around them. Let me know your thoughts and how exactly I should go about building the new supports.

My end goal is to replace the porch entirely since the wood is starting to rot from years of neglect and improper water filtering. This is my first step in order to do so
 

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Next project guys: The back porch foundation on this house is about as bad if not worse than the front porch. The cellar opens up to the back yard underneath the back porch on this property, these pictures are taken underneath.

http://s772.photobucket.com/user/mb...tion/IMG_0345_zpswkh3ag9s.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0

http://s772.photobucket.com/user/mb...tion/IMG_0344_zpsesy4twr0.jpg.html?sort=3&o=1

The only two supports other than a wooden support added a few years ago are those two made from brick. They are starting to sag and come apart in some areas and just don't seem very sturdy to me. My thought is to remove the cinder block walls beneath them (obviously after bracing the porch and removing the brick) and then replace those walls but build new cinder block columns from the bottom of the new walls up to the porch floor.

In simpler words basically instead of having the supports resting on the wall (is this even ok?) I would build new pillars that rest directly on the ground with the walls built around them. Let me know your thoughts and how exactly I should go about building the new supports.

My end goal is to replace the porch entirely since the wood is starting to rot from years of neglect and improper water filtering. This is my first step in order to do so


New pillars can't rest on the ground, you need to pour a footing for the new pillars, then the pillars on top of those, can't see where you live from here but the footings have to be below the frost line.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
New pillars can't rest on the ground, you need to pour a footing for the new pillars, then the pillars on top of those, can't see where you live from here but the footings have to be below the frost line.
I am in Schuylkill County Pennsylvania. Which means this project needs to be put on hold until April most likely. How do I go about pouring a footing? Would I use one of those cylindrical molds to pour the cement in? I'd prefer to use a wooden pillar vs cinder blocks, since the size of the porch is small, I feel the blocks would be overkill. Keep in mind the area that these cinder block walls are built is below the soil line. There are steps that lead up into the backyard.

The existing pillars rest directly on the walls which top off at about an inch above soil line. The floor of this area beneath the porch is about 36 inches beneath the soil line.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
New pillars can't rest on the ground, you need to pour a footing for the new pillars, then the pillars on top of those, can't see where you live from here but the footings have to be below the frost line.
Is it possible to pour a new footing that doubles as the existing wall to hold up the dirt from entering the area under the porch? As I said the wall is approximately 36 inches in height. What options do I have as far as a wooden pillar?
 

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Is it possible to pour a new footing that doubles as the existing wall to hold up the dirt from entering the area under the porch? As I said the wall is approximately 36 inches in height. What options do I have as far as a wooden pillar?

Dig down and see if there's a footing under the wall.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Dig down and see if there's a footing under the wall.
I will work on that tomorrow once day breaks. I am assuming there is not a footer since my father installed those walls after we moved in 20 years ago. My parents were not very keen on 'code compliance' and what not, the cheapest was the way to go sadly.

So assuming there is no footer, I'm guessing the porch would need to be braced, walls and supports removed, and we would need to dig down an additional 36"? Again this wall drops about 36" from the yard at soil level. It is exposed on one side though.

Last question, once the new walls are built, what type of pillar do I use? How do I attach said pillar to the wall and floor joist on the porch?
 

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Yes if the frost line is 36" go to 42" and pour the footing, then use a simpson strong tie set into the footing to accept the 4x4 or whatever you will use.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Okay. I don't think I have the money to do all that right now. Since there's a retaining wall there how to I feel it so that there's a footer, wall, and then the post on top? How do I attach the postholder to it?

Lastly, is there anything I can do to brace this well enough right now to last about a year? The porch is solid it is just weakened. Can I just use a third post and just set it in a loose postholder and set that on top of the wall, then attach it to the joist? This won't be permanent, just until I get to fix it the right way
 

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Yes if the frost line is 36" go to 42" and pour the footing, then use a simpson strong tie set into the footing to accept the 4x4 or whatever you will use.
The wooden pillar can't be buried. He needs to pour the footing with some vertical rebar embedded in it, put a sonotube on the footing around the rebar that clears the surface by several inches, and fill that with concrete. Then he can embed a strong tie at the top of the filled sonotube to connect to the wooden pier.
 

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The wooden pillar can't be buried. He needs to pour the footing with some vertical rebar embedded in it, put a sonotube on the footing around the rebar that clears the surface by several inches, and fill that with concrete. Then he can embed a strong tie at the top of the filled sonotube to connect to the wooden pier.

Who said anything about a buried pillar, and what exactly is the vertical rebar adding to this footing????
 

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Who said anything about a buried pillar, and what exactly is the vertical rebar adding to this footing????
Yes if the frost line is 36" go to 42" and pour the footing, then use a simpson strong tie set into the footing to accept the 4x4 or whatever you will use.
Just clarifying the description for the OP so he doesn't use a buried post footing, which would be a bad idea for the OP but is done in some areas for decks. The footing is technically the bearing area at the bottom of the hole. The pier rests on top of the footing. Embedded rebar ties the two together.

This is a buried post footing, OP should absolutely not do this as the post will rot, whether it is pressure treated or not.


The OP needs to have a concrete pier on top of the footing that clears the free surface, then a wooden post can be attached with a strong tie.
 

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Just clarifying the description for the OP so he doesn't use a buried post footing, which would be a bad idea for the OP but is done in some areas for decks. The footing is technically the bearing area at the bottom of the hole. The pier rests on top of the footing. Embedded rebar ties the two together.

This is a buried post footing, OP should absolutely not do this as the post will rot, whether it is pressure treated or not.


The OP needs to have a concrete pier on top of the footing that clears the free surface, then a wooden post can be attached with a strong tie.

Your over thinking this, dig a 42" deep hole and fill it with concrete to the top with a simpson tie embedded at the top, done and done.
 
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