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Discussion Starter #1
This isn't exactly a plumbing issue but I didn't think any other forum here was more appropriate. We have an old concrete laundry sink from the 1930s (pictures below). We intend to keep it, not replace it. It has decades of soap scum build-up and such. I'd appreciate advice on the best way to clean it up as much as possible (I've tried just a stiff brush and water, but that doesn't do anything). I don't intend to paint it, so I'm not trying to etch it. I don't want to use anything dangerous such as muriatic acid. Would white vinegar be good? Or what about a concrete cleaner (such as used for driveways), although there's no oil or grease on the sink. Thanks for your help. /Rav
 

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Hate to bust your bubble but it's not worth all the time to try and clean it.
Once it is cleaned it now so pitted it would be impossble to keep clean.
 

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If it was mine, I'd go with the muratic acid- masons use it or something similar on brick. Could even try TSP.
 

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While I agree with the comments about smashing it, there is something to be said about those old concrete sinks. If it's one of the ones i'm thinking about, the thing is huge, and has two giant basins. If you can clean it well enough to get some other kind of coating to stick to it, it might be worth keeping around. (It probably will never look pretty)
 

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Try a concrete cleaner....any good hardware store or big box will have it.
 

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LOL depending on the sledge hammer 20 to 30 hits they are pretty strong. some steel reinforced. :bangin:
I found it best to take them out like a water heater- on a hand truck.
But the OP said he wanted to keep it so I didn't suggest tossing it.....
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I wouldn't exactly say it looks pretty now, but I think I was successful at cleaning it up. I used Simple Green Lime Scale Remover, which is relatively mild but did the job along with a Scotch-Brite pad. The drain and plumbing underneath is in decent shape so it was worth it for us to keep this old concrete laundry tub going. If you're interested, on the bottom it says "Maryland Nustone Corp Laundry Tray," and handwritten is "10-13-31." Thanks for all of the responses.

See pics below (view is of the same area both before and after).
 

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Roofmaster
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Far cry from the HD Plastic shakey legged POS posted, aint it?

I was going to say to sand blast it, then epoxy coat it, as you sound like you are keen to keep it. The problem I saw with these is the Angle Iron Stand rusts out, and the sink is so heavy the stand collapses.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Far cry from the HD Plastic shakey legged POS posted, aint it?

I was going to say to sand blast it, then epoxy coat it, as you sound like you are keen to keep it. The problem I saw with these is the Angle Iron Stand rusts out, and the sink is so heavy the stand collapses.
Sure is! Despite a small amount of surface rust on our tubs stand, it's in good shape (see pic below).
 

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I've seen lots of them mounted on cinderblocks, never a stand like that.

:thumbup:
 

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Alan, Thats cause you are a young Pup. :wink:

That Stand is in great shape! Nice Job on the drylock coating too!

What is the caterpillar gut green thing in the corner????
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Alan, Thats cause you are a young Pup. :wink:

That Stand is in great shape! Nice Job on the drylock coating too!

What is the caterpillar gut green thing in the corner????
That's an old rusting storage cabinet. A project for another day!
 

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Concrete laundry sink cleaning... These are gems compared to the cheap cheesy plastic laundry sinks sold today. Clean with muriatic acid once clean you can fill pits and cracks with a marine grade polyester filler (I use Quantum 1) then sand smooth, now you can use a 2 component primer and if possible apply a speckle coat which will hide most flaws then use a polyester 2 component clear coat so the concrete sink is protected from laundry bleach. Did my neighbors over 12 years ago and still going strong

You can see some examples here at bathrenovationhq dot com/services/concrete-sink-refinishing/
 
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