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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to find a way to secure a closet door track to the ceiling.

Most closet doors I have seen are framed with an opening like a door with a header across the top. I have one closet where the door opening goes all the way up to the ceiling. You can see the track is mounted on the ceiling. The doors are bifolds 96" tall.



Couple of issues.

The track is not secured to the ceiling. I used a stud finder and couldn't find any wood joists along the footprint of the track anywhere. The joists run parallel to the track, there is no framing crossing it above that can be used to secure the track.

The track is attached to the ceiling sheetrock with four toggle bolts. The sheetrock can't hold the weight of the closet door.

The last owner put in crown mouldings. If you look at the picture above to the left the crown moulding actually interferes with the bifold door. When the door opens to about 75 degrees the top of the door hits the crown moulding, and I believe over time, repeat attempts to try and open the door wider against the crown moulding put even more stress on the door and helped pulled the track away from the ceiling. I see some cracks on the ceiling around the toggle bolt holes.

So now I have removed the door and the track. Here is a pic with everything removed.



I can't get access to the attic, it is very tight there and no way I can put in some wood bracing on the other side of the ceiling.

I am wondering if I take a piece of 2X4, cut to ~48" length (the closet door opening is 48-1/4"), lay it flat against the ceiling sheetrock, not secured to the ceiling, but only secure the 2X4 to the sides of the closet door opening by say toe-nailing, would that give me enough support to hang a door track on the 2X4? I was thinking turning the 2X4 on the side instead of laying flat against the ceiling but if I did that I would lose another 2" of clearance up top and I have a shelf up top and the reduced clearance may be an issue.

I am also thinking about not using bifolds because the crown moulding is still in the way so any idea on other closet door options would be much appreciated.
 

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Toggle bolts or plastic anchors should hold that door just fine. The weight is all held at the wall end of the track. The rest is only a guide to hold the closed door in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The way it was hung, it was using toggle bolts. That didn't work.

The previous toggle bolts have already been abusing the ceiling causing the toggle bolt holes to be enlarged with cracks around them. Finding new locations to drill holes would just end up with the same problem a year from now.

I don't want to lower the top of the door (by much), because that would reduce the clearance to use the top shelf in the closet.

That's why I am thinking of using 2X4 laying flat but secured only on the ends to the top of the walls (there are wood there to toenail to).

At the same time, thinking of something else (besides bifold doors) because the bifold doors opening and hitting the crown moulding is part of the problem, it slams against it and in the process worked the track loose. I may need something that doesn't interfere with the crown moulding, or remove the crown moulding and cut it shorter.

One thought is to use a sliding fabric panel system. It involves a track, and a few fabric panels. Like this.



Now these are much lighter in weight, they are hung on a track like the bifolds. They can be trimmed to any length, and they would not bang against the crown moulding.
 

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Insult not intended. When you say toggle bolt do you mean one on the right in the image below?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Insult not intended. When you say toggle bolt do you mean one on the right in the image below?
Yes. Now I don't know what kind of toggle bolts because once I backed out the bolts I can't see the left over piece on the other side, not sure if it's a metal hinged things in your picture, or a plastic thing where you turn 90 degrees once you pushed it in.

The track is holding better on the right side, but the left side where the crown moulding is in the way, I know each time it's opened it bangs against the moulding and pulls against the track more and more, working the bolts loose, and then someone tried to secure even more by drilling in a few more drywall screws LOL. Now as I feel along the whole strip on the ceiling it's been so mutilated I don't think it will hold anything up using just the rock.
 

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The problem is the pressure point the crown molding is having on the track when the door is opening. This will effect the door/track whatever you do.
Options:
1. Be more careful opening the door. This would not work in my house.
2. Move the crown molding back out of the way.
3. Install a narrow wall out from the crown molding wall and buy narrower doors.
4. Install shorter doors(lower then the crown molding) so they open all the way to the wall without hitting anything.

The doors seem to have been an after thought and was put in the space without taking into consideration the hinderances involved.
 

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Then I'm inclined to agree with Joed and now Ron. There should not be any weight pulling down from a properly installed bi-fold door. The weight is on the pivot hinge. The track is only a guide subject to some lateral stress.

The bad new is the only way I see that would solve the problem if you can't access it from the attic requires cutting out some drywall and adding blocking.

A lightweight, custom made flat panel curtain on a ceiling track is the only option I see for no demo work. This is a cheaper version of the flat panels mentioned above.
 

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I would put a piece of 1"x4" on the left side all the way up from the floor to the ceiling, with another piece of 1"x4" that goes across the ceiling horizontally. Glue and screw the two together first before installing them in the opening and drill two pocket screw holes on the right end of the horizontal piece to attach the board at the right-top. Caulk and paint.

Then you have a properly framed opening to reinstall the door in. You might have to trim a bit off the left side, the right side and the bottom of the door to fit it back in. Those doors also look better with another piece of trim about 3/4" square to hide the top track.

I suggested 1"x4", but you might prefer 1"x5" if you like.
 
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