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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to be installing some wainscoting and crown molding in a room and am a beginner so I probably won't be using the nail gun a whole lot. So I'm hopefully going to keep the nail gun price under $150. Below are three nail guns I was thinking about getting. I'm not sure what gauge I should go with I like the 15 gauge gun since it's angled and I've read online that I want an angled gun but I wasn't sure if the nails would be to big. I couldn't find many angled guns that were 16 or 18 gauge. Please reply back and let me know which of the three guns you think I should go with or just reply back with the gauge you think I should use for wainscoting or crown molding. Any help would be appreciated.

15 gauge
http://www.amazon.com/Factory-Recon...-Gauge/dp/B000F10HV6/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

16 gauge
http://www.amazon.com/Factory-Recon...=1364400033&sr=1-2&keywords=Nail+Gun+16+gauge

18 gauge
http://www.amazon.com/Hitachi-NT50A...=1364400011&sr=1-2&keywords=Nail+Gun+18+gauge

Thanks
 

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Jack of all - master none
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1,304 Posts
The 18g brad nailer might be a little small for some things. I use my little 18g for things like picture frame molding or other very small or more-delicate pieces. For most trim and crown work, the 16g finish nailer is what I use. I've never had an "angled" finish nailer, but never had any problems with the straight nailers I've used either. Wait for someone with more experience to speak on the merits of those two.
 

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Roofmaster
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I have a Hitachi NT65MA2 for general finish work. Angled, takes up to a 2.5 inch 15 Gage nail. I also have a Hitachi 1/4 inch stapler which is very handy. I bought them both as recons, but they were new for all intents and purposes. I use and love them both, I use super lube air tool lube in both. no problems at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
After doing some more reading online now I'm thinking of going with the 16 gauge since some people say an 18 gauge isn't strong enough and some people say a 15 gauge will work but will leave large nail holes and may split the trim. So does it matter that the 16 gauges are not angled?
 

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Roofmaster
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I suggest that you look at the actual difference between 15 and 16 gage. It is miniscule. Splitting is more a function of how close you nail to the end of the board. I don't nail closer than about 3 inches. The angled feature is important when you are working in corners like crown and dental molding. Since both are available, why not get the one that is angled?
 

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journeyman carpenter
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15 gauge has more holding power where the nail has a head on it. this is very important for exterior trim where the material is subject to weather and seasonal temperature changes.

for interior work 16 gauge is all thats needed.. it wont split the wood as the nails have a chiseled tip so they punch through the material .. the same will happen with hand nails if you blunt the end by hitting it with a hammer before driving it. angled guns are less finicky than straight ones.. the trick is to actually find one though.. locally no one sells angles 16 gauge guns even the tool dealers...
 

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I use a 15 gauge angled finish nailer for most of the trim, and my little brad nailer to pin the miters and thin edges.
 
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