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Discussion Starter #1
i'm installing a new bathroom in the basement and will be roughing in water lines for a toilet and shower. Since it's the basement, finding both a hot/cold water feed was not a problem. However i'm a bit weary about soldering but found a fantastic alternative called PEX. couple of quick questions here tho


1. is it bad if i split my copper lines and install a T connection that connects to a PEX pipe?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQGL8MBLlaE


2. how do i secure the PEX piping to the wall? same bracket as the ones the brackets for copper lines? does it need to be secured at all??

3. can i split (T) a PEX line?

4. for a toilet water line and showers, isn't it required by code to have shut off values? if so, it seems like having copper line maybe a little more rigid??
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
bought some crimping tools today.

the plan is to run 3/4 pipe from the main line for both hot/cold to bathroom where they'll split to the following:

1. main line will be a 3/4 copper split T with another adapter attacked for pex
2. 1/2 split to cold for toilet
3. 1/2 split cold/hot for wet bar on the other side of bathroom
4. 1/2 split cold/hot for small 32x34 shower.


sounds about right??


question as to do water feeds have to come from the floor or can it be drawn in from the ceiling?? this is a pretty low basement.


edit.. there are several different pex pipes out there. which brand should i get? i've read that some are terrible.
 

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1. is it bad if i split my copper lines and install a T connection that connects to a PEX pipe?
It's fine.

2. how do i secure the PEX piping to the wall? same bracket as the ones the brackets for copper lines? does it need to be secured at all??
Talon clamps. Yes they need to be secured, ~ 36" horizontally according to my code.

3. can i split (T) a PEX line?
Yes.

4. for a toilet water line and showers, isn't it required by code to have shut off values? if so, it seems like having copper line maybe a little more rigid??
Yes a shut-off valve is required for toilet, and the new shower valves come with built in stops. For toilets, sinks, etc..., use a copper pex stub out.

 

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1 through 4 are fine.

question as to do water feeds have to come from the floor or can it be drawn in from the ceiling?? this is a pretty low basement.
Either way is fine.

edit.. there are several different pex pipes out there. which brand should i get? i've read that some are terrible.
I can't speak to what brand names are available to you, but I go with what my local plumbing supply houses give me. Make sure whatever you decide to use is rated for potable water and has some type of certification (UL, CSA, ...).
 
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