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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My house is sagging need advise on jacking up please pictures inside

I included some pictures. I have 2 main beams made of 3-2x12's nailed together on top of the pillars. Who ever built the house shimmed it very badly. My house has sunken at least and inch in the center. Mainly because the shims have crushed. I do have poured walls so the outer edges of the house are fine. The 2 main beams holding the house need to be jacked up. I have started. I noticed today the 3-2x12s are seperated about a 1/4 inch. I can see the nails. Before i jack any further i want to seek advice.

The house was built in 01. I have several cracks in the walls. A few doors are not shutting right. It's a two story.

So far I started on the side which has sunken the most. i have placed 4 - 20 ton jacks along the beam which if roughly 33 feet long. I have raised the house about 1/8th so far in a 3 day period. Is there anything I should do to keep the 3-2x12's together they seem to be seperating.

What should I shim it with?
If anyone would like to comment please let me know if there is anything i am not explaining correctly. I can take pictures of anything if needed.


Thanks













 

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Move house up very slowly and very evenly to minimize drywall cracking throughout the house. Use solid cement blocks to replace those wood shims. Then add steel shims to make up the last difference. Blocks are available in 1", 2", 4" and 8" sizes. I forget the name but special truss beam screws are made for the proper attachment of beam components. Screw them in a staggered pattern towards the bottom third and top third of the beams from both sides every 12" Check a real lumber store for these screws. They are code so it will be available.
 

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Good advice Bob. Concrete blocks with steel shims. I saw one pick where a 2x12 splice had missed the shim and you should try to catch that one if you can and any others. Probably what happened was all the blocking just shrank, and the 2x12s as well along with the wood crushing. Very poorly done job.
 

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Get some plywood in a variety of thicknesses. As you jack and get the original shims loose, start sliding plywood shims in. Then if your jacks creep down, the load will transfer to the plywood shims. The plywood shims will be temporary protection until you get it up to level. Then remove them to install permanent blocking. The permanent shims should be as large as possible to get as much footprint from the beam as you can. The load was too concentrated on the original shims. Also make certain that the posts on top of your jacks can't kick out. Take your time. It didn't sag in a few days, so don't be in a hurry to jack it back up in a few days. Going slow will allow the rest of the house to adjust itself to a new position. You can still expect a few drywall pops here and there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Move house up very slowly and very evenly to minimize drywall cracking throughout the house. Use solid cement blocks to replace those wood shims. Then add steel shims to make up the last difference. Blocks are available in 1", 2", 4" and 8" sizes. I forget the name but special truss beam screws are made for the proper attachment of beam components. Screw them in a staggered pattern towards the bottom third and top third of the beams from both sides every 12" Check a real lumber store for these screws. They are code so it will be available.
Would you suggest something like the blocks I have holding the jacks up?

Also I checked into some Truss screws there expensive, can I use bolts and washers?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good advice Bob. Concrete blocks with steel shims. I saw one pick where a 2x12 splice had missed the shim and you should try to catch that one if you can and any others. Probably what happened was all the blocking just shrank, and the 2x12s as well along with the wood crushing. Very poorly done job.
I am working on that next not sure how yet.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Get some plywood in a variety of thicknesses. As you jack and get the original shims loose, start sliding plywood shims in. Then if your jacks creep down, the load will transfer to the plywood shims. Also make certain that the posts on top of your jacks can't kick out. Take your time. It didn't sag in a few days, so don't be in a hurry to jack it back up in a few days. Going slow will allow the rest of the house to adjust itself to a new position. You can still expect a few drywall pops here and there.
I agree, I have pressure treated 6x6s with a metal plate the same size bolted to the 6x6 on either end of the jack head.
 

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I included some pictures. I have 2 main beams made of 3-2x12's nailed together on top of the pillars. Who ever built the house shimmed it very badly. My house has sunken at least and inch in the center. Mainly because the shims have crushed. I do have poured walls so the outer edges of the house are fine. The 2 main beams holding the house need to be jacked up. I have started. I noticed today the 3-2x12s are seperated about a 1/4 inch. I can see the nails. Before i jack any further i want to seek advice.

The house was built in 01. I have several cracks in the walls. A few doors are not shutting right. It's a two story.

So far I started on the side which has sunken the most. i have placed 4 - 20 ton jacks along the beam which if roughly 33 feet long. I have raised the house about 1/8th so far in a 3 day period. Is there anything I should do to keep the 3-2x12's together they seem to be seperating.

What should I shim it with?
If anyone would like to comment please let me know if there is anything i am not explaining correctly. I can take pictures of anything if needed.


Thanks













Use these...http://www.grkfasteners.com/en/RSS_1_2_information.htm
They can be found at most lumber yards and can be installed with an 18v cordless. (most HO have one).

If you cannot find the GRK fasteners, HD sells these...
http://www.fastenmaster.com/product.aspx?currentPage=1&catID=7&prodID=8

With the amount of blocking under the beam, you could also post it with the left over 6x6's you are using. Just install them in a vertical position.

From the look of the nailing pattern on the beam, there is just not enough nails in it. 2x12's should be nailed 4 to 5 nails across, 16"oc front and back
Using the screws, install one 1 1/4" from the top move over 16" and install one 1 1/4" from the bottom (up & down) do the entire beam from and back (backside do the opposite)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Use these...http://www.grkfasteners.com/en/RSS_1_2_information.htm
They can be found at most lumber yards and can be installed with an 18v cordless. (most HO have one).

If you cannot find the GRK fasteners, HD sells these...
http://www.fastenmaster.com/product.aspx?currentPage=1&catID=7&prodID=8

With the amount of blocking under the beam, you could also post it with the left over 6x6's you are using. Just install them in a vertical position.

From the look of the nailing pattern on the beam, there is just not enough nails in it. 2x12's should be nailed 4 to 5 nails across, 16"oc front and back
Using the screws, install one 1 1/4" from the top move over 16" and install one 1 1/4" from the bottom (up & down) do the entire beam from and back (backside do the opposite)
Will do that. Yes the nails are very spread out 16 penney nails. Most have sunken into the 2x12 1/4-1/2 inch and bent from the middle 2x12 sagging more.
 

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That's a LOT of deflection for just timber shrinkage. There may be something else going on here.

One thing I would highly recommend is to get yourself some "control" lines on the outside walls that you say are stable, and transfer them with a laser level to each of the columns. With marks or lines in place on every column, you can keep track, over time, of any possible sinking of the columns, themselves, by periodically re-shooting comparisons of all the lines.

There is a chance that you may do a lot of work for nothing if the columns ARE sinking, and continue to do so.

Look for the possible sources, not just patch the symptoms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That's a LOT of deflection for just timber shrinkage. There may be something else going on here.

One thing I would highly recommend is to get yourself some "control" lines on the outside walls that you say are stable, and transfer them with a laser level to each of the columns. With marks or lines in place on every column, you can keep track, over time, of any possible sinking of the columns, themselves, by periodically re-shooting comparisons of all the lines.

There is a chance that you may do a lot of work for nothing if the columns ARE sinking, and continue to do so.

Look for the possible sources, not just patch the symptoms.
I did check into that most research i did said if columns sink they will not be level. I Checked everyone there level. There straight. I will mark like you said and check over time and see if there sinking. I did purchase a laser level and the main beam is all out of whack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
That's a LOT of deflection for just timber shrinkage. There may be something else going on here.

One thing I would highly recommend is to get yourself some "control" lines on the outside walls that you say are stable, and transfer them with a laser level to each of the columns. With marks or lines in place on every column, you can keep track, over time, of any possible sinking of the columns, themselves, by periodically re-shooting comparisons of all the lines.

There is a chance that you may do a lot of work for nothing if the columns ARE sinking, and continue to do so.

Look for the possible sources, not just patch the symptoms.
Which laser level would you suggest? i bought 2 because there were about 50% off at lowes. I got a 5 beam laser and a rotary laser. Which would you suggest keeping and using.
 

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My preference is the rotary type. But they are limited to just the one plane. I'd say to check each of yours for accuracy by setting them up and marking some references, then take them apart, and set them up again in another location, and see if the (relative) lines match up exactly as they did on the first setup.

Of course the height of the new level location will be different, but the variance should be the same measurement everywhere.

Then, which one do you feel more comfortable working with? Which is quickest and easiest to set up? Which one has the better optics (brightness, and fine, focused distinction of lines)? Accuracy is, of course, the most important thing, but if it's close, it's better to work with one that you enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Use these...http://www.grkfasteners.com/en/RSS_1_2_information.htm
They can be found at most lumber yards and can be installed with an 18v cordless. (most HO have one).

If you cannot find the GRK fasteners, HD sells these...
http://www.fastenmaster.com/product.aspx?currentPage=1&catID=7&prodID=8

With the amount of blocking under the beam, you could also post it with the left over 6x6's you are using. Just install them in a vertical position.

From the look of the nailing pattern on the beam, there is just not enough nails in it. 2x12's should be nailed 4 to 5 nails across, 16"oc front and back
Using the screws, install one 1 1/4" from the top move over 16" and install one 1 1/4" from the bottom (up & down) do the entire beam from and back (backside do the opposite)

What size would you sugggest I will stop by home depot. 4" or 6"
 

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Depends on the width of your beam. I think they need to go 2/3 through and .
The original thread said...
I have 2 main beams made of 3-2x12's nailed together on top of the pillars.
4" bolts would be considered at least 2/3 in a 4 1/2" wide beam? yes? 6" would go through and not hold anything more if the threads are sticking out the back.

You explained it better with fewer words but I did want it bolted the same way:thumbup:
bolted with opposing staggered spacing from both sides
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
My preference is the rotary type. But they are limited to just the one plane. I'd say to check each of yours for accuracy by setting them up and marking some references, then take them apart, and set them up again in another location, and see if the (relative) lines match up exactly as they did on the first setup.

Of course the height of the new level location will be different, but the variance should be the same measurement everywhere.

Then, which one do you feel more comfortable working with? Which is quickest and easiest to set up? Which one has the better optics (brightness, and fine, focused distinction of lines)? Accuracy is, of course, the most important thing, but if it's close, it's better to work with one that you enjoy.
The rotary seems to cover more ground and it came with a tripod.
Thanks for your input
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The original thread said...4" bolts would be considered at least 2/3 in a 4 1/2" wide beam? yes? 6" would go through and not hold anything more if the threads are sticking out the back.

You explained it better with fewer words but I did want it bolted the same way:thumbup:
Sounds good will stick with 4" screws 16" apart top bottom opposite on the other side bottom then top
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Move house up very slowly and very evenly to minimize drywall cracking throughout the house. Use solid cement blocks to replace those wood shims. Then add steel shims to make up the last difference. Blocks are available in 1", 2", 4" and 8" sizes. I forget the name but special truss beam screws are made for the proper attachment of beam components. Screw them in a staggered pattern towards the bottom third and top third of the beams from both sides every 12" Check a real lumber store for these screws. They are code so it will be available.
Considering the pillars are cement, will cement blocks crack under pressure since the tops of the pillars are rouch cement they are not to smooth? I have found a place to get metal plates cut to size. Can/should I use pressure treated 2x4's or 2x6's to stack on top of the pillars then add metal shims to fit?
 
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