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Discussion Starter #1
This is my 4th drywall experience. I have some basic questions that I cant seem to really get answered. This is a 1000 square foot basement with 2 rooms and a lot of custom work like tray ceilings next to soffits and a tv wall with an arch. I didnt really want to do anymore drywall this large of a job but it just kind of happened.


How thick are the mud coats supposed to be? After my 4th DIY you think i wouldnt have to ask but you can never really tell in videos. My first after tape coat is thin enough to where if I veer away from my stroke a bit the tape shows back up. Doesnt take much. But i know I use a ton on corner beads and flat and butt intersections. Professional work always looks like it was barely touched



Is there a structural component to sanding in between coats (bonding, etc)?
It seems mixed on whether or not you have to do this unless needed. I am trying to keep everything as clean as possible to avoid sanding between coats other than knocking off ridges.


fish eyes, pock marks, etc. I dont see a ton after my first coat, but is it necessary to sand them out or can you just fill with the second coat? I actually dont think I saw any, but my main question is is it important to sand every coat smooth? If I have waves after the first coat, its safe to say ill have it after the 2nd and 3rd due to technique flaws. Why sand all 3 times if theyll get covered?


My finished work has always gotten compliments from people that know what they are looking at but I know I have always used way more mud and had to sand enough for 5 times the job. Im trying to minimize my work this time but still produce quality. With all of the soffits and tray ceilings, I have 50 inside corners and 68 outside corners, so to overwork everything like I usually do, it would cost me weeks of time.

Thanks
 

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I don't sand, I use an abrasive screen in various grits.

Try to make each coat thin enough that you don't have to screen anything but the final coat, screen and then a quick light sanding.

Use a wider and wider knife with each coat.
 

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I started with a 4 in the corners and plan on moving up a size each time. same with the rest.

This was my first time using setting mud and specifically durabond for the tape coat. Tried the best i could to keep it clean because of the lack of sanding that could be done. Moving to easysand90 now. making sure to keep all of the edges tight after the last swipe.

I do have some waves in some of my pulls. I will see how a screen does. I have 3 different grits. Bought the cheap hyde no dust vac extension to try it out. I dont mind the mess of sanding as much as i mind wasting my time.
 

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I hate sanding and if an extra coat of mud will prevent extra sanding that's the route I'll go. Most of us only sand the final coat. I also prefer sanding screens over sandpaper. How did you get waves in some of your runs? it sounds like you might be applying the mud to thick.
 

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This was my first time using setting mud and specifically durabond for the tape coat. Moving to easysand90 now. making sure to keep all of the edges tight after the last swipe.

I will see how a screen does. I have 3 different grits. Bought the cheap hyde no dust vac extension to try it out. I dont mind the mess of sanding as much as i mind wasting my time.
I use grits; 60, 120, 180.

The Hyde dust vac works great however I seldom use it as it slows me down because of the bulkiness, and the suction creates drag slowing me down, besides tiring on the arms.

I don't know what you mean by keeping all the edges tight? Runs? Wells? Too thin a mix. I use a hack rather than a pan.

Durabond is the way to go for the first tape coat, after the tape is on the wall, I go to Easysand 20 but if you are not fast, use Easysand 45. If you didn't plan to use a whole bag of Durabond for the tape coat, EasySand90 or 45 would have worked.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I hate sanding and if an extra coat of mud will prevent extra sanding that's the route I'll go. Most of us only sand the final coat. I also prefer sanding screens over sandpaper. How did you get waves in some of your runs? it sounds like you might be applying the mud to thick.
I got the chatter from some of the corners after doing the first side. I shouldve cleaned it up better. Funny thing about problems with mudding. It can only be blamed on yourself.
 

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I use grits; 60, 120, 180.

The Hyde dust vac works great however I seldom use it as it slows me down because of the bulkiness, and the suction creates drag slowing me down, besides tiring on the arms.

I don't know what you mean by keeping all the edges tight? Runs? Wells? Too thin a mix. I use a hack rather than a pan.

Durabond is the way to go for the first tape coat, after the tape is on the wall, I go to Easysand 20 but if you are not fast, use Easysand 45. If you didn't plan to use a whole bag of Durabond for the tape coat, EasySand90 or 45 would have worked.
Now that im done messing with the corners and doing butts flats and outside corners, the mud is going a lot faster.

Im using easysand 90. Theres so much work that it wouldnt matter the setting time i used itll be dry by the time I get back to it anyway. I avoided easysand 210 from reading that the water wont stay in it long enough for it to set in a lot of cases. Since that may or may not be true I went with 90.

Ive always hated a pan. Im mixing a bit on the thin side and I used the pan for doing the corners and butts where I needed to pull tape and use 2 hands for some things. Setting down the hawk in some instances wouldve had mud on the ground. What i meant by keeping the edges tight was just making sure i didnt leave any ridges and that they were all feathered properly on the outside of the run to avoid work later.
 

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There is no reason for a homeowner to use any setting compound really, let alone Durabond, for any coat. Assuming you don't use mesh tape, which homeowners really should not. I would recommend standard drying compound, with paper tape in the corners and FibaFuse everywhere else.


You should not be sanding until the final coat. Ridges should simply be scraped off. Pock marks should not be sanded out, they should be mudded over. Your first coat should be thick enough so that you full cover the tape. This is less of an issue when using FibaFuse than paper tape since FibaFuse will actually sand, but paper tape will fuzz up if sanded.


Your second coat should be thick enough to cover any waviness in the first coat. Basically if the first coat was thick enough to fully cover the tape, then the second coat simply has to be thick enough to cover the gap between the high point of the joint, and the low point of the wall about 6-8" out. That is a fair amount of compound though.



The third coat can be thinned a little, in fact for larger jobs I sometimes make it a little thicker than pancake batter and roll it on with a paint roller. I personally would not use a 4" knife for any coat. I usually use 6", 8-10", then 12". You have to press the knife on the outward (outside) edge, especially on the final coat, to get a good thin feather so little sanding is required.


I would recommend using standard drying compound, adding about a half cup of water right out of the gate and mixing well with a good mud mixer (high torque, low speed.) If you plan on saving any of your compound after the job, I would also add a capful of Chlorox to it.
 
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