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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I'm in the middle of a bathroom remodel and am at the point where I'm replacing the mixing valve, etc. for the tub/shower. I'm installing a Symmons Allura valve, with a 2 3/8" +- 1/2" rough.

After doing all my figuring for the depth of the new wall (tile, mastic, 1/2" drywall) I've located the centerline depth for the supply pipes coming up from the floor. I've also figured out where the drain will be for the new tub... and of course the new drain is 1 1/2" off the center of the existing drain. This means that for the new drain, valve, and shower to line up... I have to move the mixing valve over 1 1/2". You can see the new mixing valve center line in the pics, just above and to the left of the existing valve (to the right of the stud).

The problem with this is that if I do that... taking into account the depth of the mixing valve/supply lines... one of my supply lines would be smack in the middle of the adjacent stud. The other side is the finished wall of a stairwell... so moving the stud involves new drywall, paint, and ladders to install it all. Not ideal. :(

So... I'm looking for ideas! How do I get this mixing valve in, centered with the drains on the tub (so it doesn't look weird being off-center) without demolishing more than I need to? Thanks for the help!

~Allan
 

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Exactly what Canadian club said----Notch the stud--add one or two new ones--no need to disturb the drywall on the backside of the wall----
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
The problem I see with notching would be I have to notch all the way to the floor. Not just at the point of the mixing valve, in order to accommodate the supply pipe coming up from the floor. The depth of the center-line of the supply pipes is basically the edge of the original wall stud (I've had to extend the studs to get the space from 61+ down to 60"... the length of the tub, 60x30... you can see the extensions on the other 2 studs and the outside corner). So, I'm relying on a little bit of flex in the pipe to shift the 1/2" inside the stud space I need to get the correct depth from the finish wall.

The only other thought I had was to extend the studs on the left by attaching a 1-1/2 by 1-1/2 piece of wood, thereby pushing the entire tub to the right 1-1/2". This would keep me from having to shift the plumbing over and I could just replace the mixing valve and pretty much leave the supply and shower pipes as-is and just put in the new valve. The issue with this approach would be I'm starting to encroach on my toilet space and I'd have to add in some sister studs on the adjacent walls to re-create the inside corners needed to hang the drywall.

Admittedly... that second option sounds like more effort with little gain now that I've written it out. Guess I'll probably go with the notching and hope for the best.

Hmmm... trying to remember why I didn't hire someone for this! :)
 

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the supply pipes do not need to extend straight up from the floor to the new valve. leave them where they are, notch for the new valve, then use a couple 45's or 90's to get them where they need to be. same goes for the shower riser
 

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How about extending the piece of pipe coming out of the valve? Then you just have to drill a hole in the stud for the pipe to stick through, and maybe another hole to get back to the correct side? Does that make sense?
 
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