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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife is finally going to be out of town for a couple weeks this fall and I thought it would be the perfect time to get started installing the new hardwood floors she has been wanting. I'm currently trying to figure out our best options for what to do with all the furniture while I'm working on this project. Current options I'm thinking through:

- Do it room by room and keep moving the furniture to an available open room while I'm working on the others

- Get one of those lockable storage containers to have it dropped off at the house

- Hire movers to haul off most of the big pieces and store until the project is complete

We have a 1600sqft single story ranch style home with no garage, shed, etc for outdoor storage. We have some attic space, but it's honestly a bit limited.

Does anyone have any additional suggestions? If I went with the storage option, how long do you think I'd need it? I'm not sure if those companies charge by the day, or if I'd have to buy a full month.

Thanks!
BPO
 

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Most of the people I have worked for (I'm a painter) use the onsite storage companies and rent one of the boxes they drop off. Seems to work out the best. Keeps you from moving stuff more than once. If that's not an option, you can move things to one side of a room and then as you complete half of a room, you can move stuff to the finished side as you work on the other side. As long as you don't have to move things more than once, you are golden.
 

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I was just about to post EXACTLY this question except for the wife outta town part! It’s exactly what we need to know also.

But in my online browsing, I’ve read that if you’re gluing down engineered hardwood, as we will, its good to roll the floor after the wood is in place, to help set the glue, and then, also, to stay off the entire floor for at least 24 hours. Wouldn’t this make moving furniture back into a just-finished room to do the next room impossible!
 

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I was just about to post EXACTLY this question except for the wife outta town part! It’s exactly what we need to know also.

But in my online browsing, I’ve read that if you’re gluing down engineered hardwood, as we will, its good to roll the floor after the wood is in place, to help set the glue, and then, also, to stay off the entire floor for at least 24 hours. Wouldn’t this make moving furniture back into a just-finished room to do the next room impossible!
I've done half dozen glue downs, and never worried or even read 24 hour set time.

I just lay it and I do walk it. (Don't have a roller)

I suppose/guess if your floor is not in plane (wavy and not flat), you might not want to place heavy point loads on it (heavy furnitre legs) which might pronounce a dip in the final flooring....of course in general you want a flat surface as the glue can only plane out small dips.

But if you are working alone, most of your finished floor will have probably 24 set time allready by the time you are ready to move heavy stuff back.

I've never had a problem...but interested if our flooring pro's have different advice.

EDIT Incidentally, glue down is slower and more costly than floating, but I do like it a lot better for it's final more solid feel.
 

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The things I were thinking about to make the decision were:
- does the funiture have to stay until she leaves (because you're still using it)
- is it a surprise and needs to be done before she gets back
- do you have help moving the stuff
- will there be subflooring added
- are you attaching floating, glued, or fastened
- will you be removing the baseboard, adding shoe molding and need painting
- do you have open rooms where you will need to continue rows through the openings
- will you be gung-ho or do a little here and there
- does $33/mo for drive-in storage vs. $250/mo for a pod make a difference
 

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Do one room at a time. It will take longer than you expect. If you have not put down wood flooring before, start with the room that is least critical that you get things perfect.

I did four rooms that way.

Moving everything out of the room is best. Thats what I did, except for my office --- desk was too big and heavy to readily move it out, so I put it on dollies and did half the room, then the other half.
 

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I’ve read that if you’re gluing down engineered hardwood, as we will, its good to roll the floor after the wood is in place, to help set the glue, and then, also, to stay off the entire floor for at least 24 hours.
And if all else fails, follow the instructions that came with the adhesive. Some say to roll, some don't. Some specifically say don't roll.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The things I were thinking about to make the decision were:
- does the funiture have to stay until she leaves (because you're still using it)
- is it a surprise and needs to be done before she gets back
- do you have help moving the stuff
- will there be subflooring added
- are you attaching floating, glued, or fastened
- will you be removing the baseboard, adding shoe molding and need painting
- do you have open rooms where you will need to continue rows through the openings
- will you be gung-ho or do a little here and there
- does $33/mo for drive-in storage vs. $250/mo for a pod make a difference
Great questions!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Fortunately, it is not a surprise and I am planning to stay with my in-laws for the 3-5 days (fingers crossed) of renovation work. So that takes a lot of the stress of a strict timetable out of the equation. The furniture could easily go before she leaves so that my father-in-law and I could start the project the day after she leaves. He's the one with the prior DIY experience and I'm hoping to learn some new skills along the way. Since my father-in-law is willing to help with the project, I'm less inclined to additionally ask him for help with moving labor to lug furniture around the house to complete the project. Since he's volunteering his time, I'm leaning more towards just removing the furniture completely to expedite the project a little more quickly.

I was trying to get some estimates for the on site storage containers as @Gymschu recommended, but am realizing that some of these companies (like Pods) are pretty expensive. Other companies (like Upack) won't leave the container at my address for more than 3 days. I found this list, of other companies and am going to start calling them next. Does anyone know how to just get a plain ole cheap storage container dropped off for at least a week?
 

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Have your better half help with packing before she leaves.:smile: She may want to separate some things. Closets also. All little bottles and things. When I did the livingroom floor, I put the heaviest furniture on a dolly. 4" wheels so easy to move. Furniture on half the side and when half done, move to the new floor. If this way, careful you don't damage the tongue while rolling over them. Mine was 3/8 engineered floor.



There was a post before about the rental boxes. It may not be all weather tight and I can't remember what the problem was, but maybe it was too much moisture or heat in the box? There was some damage to things stored inside.
 

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We did the move everything to another room method for all our flooring. PITA, more economical than offsite storage though.

If we could have rented a container and stored onsite, we'd have gone with that - but there's not drop storage up here that I know of (or at least wasn't any when I'd looked at it) :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
There was a post before about the rental boxes. It may not be all weather tight and I can't remember what the problem was, but maybe it was too much moisture or heat in the box? There was some damage to things stored inside.
Very valid points! Thanks for bringing this up. I'll add this to the research list.
 

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I know people that used the containers with the cows on them. Can't recall the name at the moment.......seemed pleased with the pricing......much better pricing than the pods, I believe.
 

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Just FYI, I recently got an estimate for refinishing the hardwood floors in a house I'm thinking of buying. The contractor mentioned that he charges about 40% more if there's furniture to move around from room to room. The idea is that when he can't do the entire space at once, then there's extra waiting time for drying etc.

I imagine that the same logic applies to a DIYer. Move all the furniture out of the house so you don't have to worry about finishing one section before starting another. Assuming you have some help with moving!
 

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There is nothing to dry with an engineered wood floor and if laying down wood flooring and putting on a sealer you need to vacate the house for a couple of days.
Get felt pads for the furniture so it does not scratch the finish on your new floors.
 

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Read the directions on your flooring. It will tell you what to do with the installation method of your choice.

Personally, I do the smoosh method regarding installation. And I usually remove the baseboards and toe molding. I like to start with a clean slate.

Clean and prep the floor, get it as clean as you can since you are gluing it down. Get a respirator if you have ANY kind of breathing issues. And read the best way to get an even floor layout so that you don't get a tiny sliver at one end. (It usually involves starting with a not quite full board at one end and ends up with a not quite full board at the other end.) And if you have to, add transitions, you don't want to have buckled floors.

Finally, post pictures of your progress. We want to cheer you on.
 

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I wouldn't want to do a wood or snap-together type floor with the furniture in the room - the weight of the stuff might affect your measurements and maybe even the seems.
 

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The most convenient option would be to hire movers and transport things for the duration of the repair. You will waste a considerable amount of time moving your furniture from room to room, while you can use special services. It's what I did when I decided to equip the nursery when my wife was pregnant. Based on good reviews on the Internet, I found guys from appromoving.com who helped me take out all the furniture for the period of repair. By the way, I was delighted with their service, as they were cautious about packing and loading my furniture into their cars. I am thrilled that I immediately came across good service and had no problems. So I advise you to choose the option with loaders, as this greatly facilitates the repair.
 
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