DIY Home Improvement Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting bids on replacing my heat pump, one company said the disconnect must be moved since it doesn't meet the current regs. (which I gather are the same for an electrical panel, 36" depth, 30" wide).

The house was built in '95. They used aluminum wire, 6/2 with ground, and if I have to move it, I'll do it myself and switch to copper. I was curious though if it really has to be moved just because of the condenser replacement?
 

Attachments

·
Hvac Pro
Joined
·
23,688 Posts
I would talk to your local electrical inspector. Aluminum wire is HORRIBLE and I would get rid of it. The new heat pump probably uses less juice so you may be able to use a smaller wire. Depends on the ampacity rating of it and your local code. A simple pull plug disconnect is usually all that is required. You may have to downsize your breaker at the panel if the new unit uses less amps.

The heat pump needs proper drainage and should not be sitting directly on the ground. On our Pro site we have pics of a badly damaged unit that did not drain properly and damaged the coil from repeated freeze/thaw action.
http://www.hvacsite.com/f7/condenser-coils-going-bad-101/
 

·
GC/Master Plumber/Mech
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
Dave,

Derby ks here in hays ks that disconnsect is fine. #6 shoukd be fine but I would up grade it to copper.

Code requires a disconnect within 25 ft of appliance and within sight.

This is not considered a load center and does not have min distance requirements for access like a load center does.
 

·
GC/Master Plumber/Mech
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
I would talk to your local electrical inspector. Aluminum wire is HORRIBLE and I would get rid of it. The new heat pump probably uses less juice so you may be able to use a smaller wire. Depends on the ampacity rating of it and your local code. A simple pull plug disconnect is usually all that is required. You may have to downsize your breaker at the panel if the new unit uses less amps.

The heat pump needs proper drainage and should not be sitting directly on the ground. On our Pro site we have pics of a badly damaged unit that did not drain properly and damaged the coil from repeated freeze/thaw action.
http://www.hvacsite.com/f7/condenser-coils-going-bad-101/
Here most are wired #10 copper unless it is a 4 or larger ton unit.

Heck, do you even have an inspection office in derby?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks for the replies. The new heat pump requires the same min amp circuit of 27.x amps. Currently protected by 30 amp breaker, which I'll keep. I hate wasting money but I think in this case I'll go ahead and do it. I'll use #8 copper even though #10 would actually be legit.

I'll just run the wire, mount a new box now, and then do the disconnect/connect in the panel the day before the install. Actually..no...they'll need the power to pump the r22 into the current condenser...so, i'll make the final connection after that.
 

·
GC/Master Plumber/Mech
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
Worked in Ellis, Rush, Barton, Rice and Pawnee counties and yet have had a county inspection.

Most smaller cities require a license, no permits and no inspection.

Bigger cities like Great bend, Larnard, Hays and Victoria require inspections

Make sure your installer has taken the state test. There are alot of guys in our state that are not state tested simply because the smaller towns don't require it. I'm licensed as an eletrician in a couple of towns and have not taken the electrical exam. I have taken the exam for plumber, gas fitter and mechanical as a master.

Good luck
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top