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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, newbie here with a question, go figure!

I'm just embarking on a remodel project and unfortunately a wall I'd hoped wasn't load bearing actually is!

I don't actually want to completely remove the wall, I want to move it back a few feet so the new wall will still serve to carry a good chunk of the load, so I'm wondering what sort of beam I'd need to carry the remainder. I've attached a diagram.

The house has 2x10 joists, so ideally I'd like to recess a 10" beam. I still need to talk to the local inspector to get his thoughts, but figured I'd see if anybody here has done similar?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I will have to add a new beam/posts in the basement, but sized based on the reduced load it's carrying, assuming a beam is still tranferring load down to the existing supports in the basement...
 

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It is almost always possible to move a load bearing wall, or remove it entirely and replace with a header. Unfortunately the details tend to be complicated, including new posts, connection details, sizing the beam, reconnecting the joists, that sort of thing. Your inspector is unlikely to design the project for you, if they are anything like my inspector, they will suggest that you hire a structural engineer, architect, or an experienced contractor to do the work. If you hire a contractor, the contract will most likely use their engineer to design the project, stamp the plans, and pull the permit.

There is really no way for to get a beam size or realistic design from an internet chat forum such as this, you need professional help. Too many options, too many issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is almost always possible to move a load bearing wall, or remove it entirely and replace with a header. Unfortunately the details tend to be complicated, including new posts, connection details, sizing the beam, reconnecting the joists, that sort of thing. Your inspector is unlikely to design the project for you, if they are anything like my inspector, they will suggest that you hire a structural engineer, architect, or an experienced contractor to do the work. If you hire a contractor, the contract will most likely use their engineer to design the project, stamp the plans, and pull the permit.

There is really no way for to get a beam size or realistic design from an internet chat forum such as this, you need professional help. Too many options, too many issues.
Thanks Daniel, I was just looking up structural engineers in my area, but I wanted to just check that my general assumption is sound that the new wall will serve to reduce the load on the required beam?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My local lumber yard specced a beam via their supplier, 4 ply 14" to carry a 15' clear span, but that seems a little over zealous! They use Pacific Woodtech LVLs and based on the manufacturer's brochure I should be able to use a 3 ply?
 

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I am not sure I understand your design. The plan shows a new wall about two feet away from the old wall, and not as long. Presumably the wall is to hold up the joists, but I can't tell from the plan. The plan does not show a beam replacing the old wall, but maybe that is the idea.

Your existing joists probably overlap over the existing wall, but you don't say that, so maybe not accurate. If the joists do overlap over the existing wall, your plan presumably replaces the short joists with longer joists, so they will reach the new wall. Or perhaps you plan to install a beam where the old wall was, and connect the joists. What I am trying to say is that without a detailed plan, discussion about the size of the beam is meaningless, as beam size depends entirely on the span and load on the beam.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am not sure I understand your design. The plan shows a new wall about two feet away from the old wall, and not as long. Presumably the wall is to hold up the joists, but I can't tell from the plan. The plan does not show a beam replacing the old wall, but maybe that is the idea.

Your existing joists probably overlap over the existing wall, but you don't say that, so maybe not accurate. If the joists do overlap over the existing wall, your plan presumably replaces the short joists with longer joists, so they will reach the new wall. Or perhaps you plan to install a beam where the old wall was, and connect the joists. What I am trying to say is that without a detailed plan, discussion about the size of the beam is meaningless, as beam size depends entirely on the span and load on the beam.
The new wall will be an interior, non-LBW and I'm installing an LVL to replace the existing LBW. The joists are overlap, so I'm going to cut them and use hangers to connect them to the new beam.

The specs for the new beam are 4 x 1.75" plies @ 14", with 3.5" of support at either end.

I realised that if I tried to use the new wall to offset some of the load I would need to add a second beam in the basement, so it's easier to just spec a single beam to replace the existing LBW.

Beam clear span = 15'
Joist span = 26'

Having looked at the manufactures' literature for both Pacific Woodtech 2.0E PWLVL and LP Solid 2900Fb-2.0E LVL the load tables say I'd need:

PWLVL - 3 ply 14"
LP - 2 ply 14" or 3 ply 11 7/8"
at most 3 ply 1.75" x 14", with LP saying
 

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Check to see where you're cieling joists intersect. You may be better off to put a beam in the existing wall creating an opening. You would need to go to the basement and add new supports under what would now be point loads supporting the beam.
 
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