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I have an outlet in the garage with a fridge on it. All outlets in the garage are on the same circuit, with a GFI on the first outlet in the series.

I leave extension cords plugged in to that same outlet and sometimes leave coiled on the floor. That outlet trips from time to time leaving the fridge unpowered for a few hours, and I've had to throw food away before because of it.

Logical thing to do would be to remove the extension cords, but I don't always remember to. I was thinking the fun thing to do would be to put the fridge on its own circuit and then I don't have to worry about it anymore.

How do I take an outlet, however, that is installed in the garage and drywalled in and the middle of a series of 4 or 5 outlets and put it on its own circuit? Any tips?

Or can you think of a better way to handle?
 

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It would be just as easy to install a new circuit and receptacle for the freezer. It would still need gfi protection .
 

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That would be my answer as well. You could run conduit (PVC or metallic) on the outside of the drywall, and use a surface mount box. Is the service panel also in the garage?
 

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The simplest way would be to remove the connection to the LOAD terminals on the first GFCI receptacle. Then install GFCI receptacles in all the individual boxes using only the LINE terminals. The fridge being in the garage still needs to be GFCI but it will be on its own GFCI and should only trip if the fridge has an issue.
 

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The simplest way would be to remove the connection to the LOAD terminals on the first GFCI receptacle. Then install GFCI receptacles in all the individual boxes using only the LINE terminals. The fridge being in the garage still needs to be GFCI but it will be on its own GFCI and should only trip if the fridge has an issue.
Ooooo... I love this idea.

Perhaps a stupid question - but what is the best way to identify which side is line vs load?
 

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A multimeter will be able to detect the voltage on one pair of wires. However , since you are wiring each as an independent device all the wires will connect to the line side.
 

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Check with your local electrical inspector. Some states/cities have exemptions or modifications to the NEC so far as refrigerators [freezers] in a garage needing to be on a GFCI.

And that is precisely due to the problem you are having! (Food is not cheap and one non-GFCI outlet blocked by a refrigerator, but grounded properly is safe.) And motors (which a refrigerator has) are notorious for tripping GFCI's.
 

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Check with your local electrical inspector. Some states/cities have exemptions or modifications to the NEC so far as refrigerators [freezers] in a garage needing to be on a GFCI.

And that is precisely due to the problem you are having! (Food is not cheap and one non-GFCI outlet blocked by a refrigerator, but grounded properly is safe.) And motors (which a refrigerator has) are notorious for tripping GFCI's.
The NEC is about life safety. A life is more important than spoiled food which can be replaced. While some areas may not be up to the latest code requirement, that exception for non gfi for certain spaces was removed .

If the motor is tripping a gfi it should be repaired or replaced because it is failing.
 
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While some areas may not be up to the latest code requirement, that exception for non gfi for certain spaces was removed...
Oregon still has this amendment on their web site. Are you saying this is no longer an exemption for Oregon?

Here it is...
Following From: https://www.oregon.gov/bcd/laws-rules/Documents/oars/305_Table_1-E.pdf

OESC 210.8(A)(2) (Exceptions)(2)
Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use Exception No. 1 to (2): A single receptacle for each appliance within a dedicated space that, in normal use, is not easily moved from one place to another, that is cord and plug connected, and the receptacle is labeled as “not GFCI protected.”

Exception No. 2 to (2): Receptacle ground fault protection shall not be required for a dedicated branch circuit serving a single receptacle for sewage or sump pumps.
Receptacles installed under the exceptions to 210.8(A)(2) shall not be considered as meeting the requirements of 210.52(G).


Oregon electrical codes main page...
https://www.oregon.gov/bcd/codes-stand/Pages/electrical.aspx
 
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