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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to purchase this sconce, though to my dismay it appears to need a smaller outlet box than standard.

https://www.circalighting.com/bryant-sconce-tob2022/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsZj7xduq6AIViJOzCh188Q4DEAkYASABEgL8mvD_BwE

https://circaskin.circalighting.com/media/pdf_uploads/IG_TOB2022PNWG.pdf

The electrician already put in 4" square junction boxes, though the walls are still open for the moment so I suppose they could be replaced. I'd rather not have to deal with my unpleasant electrician though, so I'm hoping there are options here for me.

Can this be addressed with some sort of universal mounting bracket?

I'm assuming the issue is the backplate on the sconce is smaller than the hole in the wall that would be left by the 4" junction box. I have a very tight space and really love this style. Any ideas would be most welcome.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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A 4" square is the wrong box for a ceiling or wall mounted fixture. Make him change it or DIY.

I doubt that fixture is UL listed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
@Let it Snow, that looks perfect actually!!! And I guess the sconce either attaches to that directly if you are lucky and the screw holes line up, or you then use one of those universal mounting brackets?

Does anything have to be adjusted to ensure the sconce back plate sits flush with the wall?

What I really don't understand is why the manufacturer would say you need a 3-inch J-Box if this is such a simple solution???
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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That is a 4" octagonal not a square. That is what any electrician would install for a wall or ceiling fixture unless something else else is specified.

Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
 

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retired framer
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Have you got the lamps and measured them, I am sure you will find the cover plate is a 1/2" bigger.
 

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For a wall sconce a junction box is not required as the wires can be connected in the back of the sconce so there is sheetrock on one side and metal on the other side of the connection. If the electrician did not run enough wire they may have put in the electrical box to hide their mistake which is not uncommon.

Easiest fix is to buy a different fixture but this is one example of why electricians need adult supervision. With my recent bath remodel I handed the electrician the wiring plan that include the exact location of the boxes for receptacles and switches and the guy mounted them 6 inches too low. Fortunately I always have a carpenter follow the electrical workers to fix dry wall damage and so could get the boxes moved higher and then repair the new drywall with new new drywall.
 

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For a wall sconce a junction box is not required as the wires can be connected in the back of the sconce so there is sheetrock on one side and metal on the other side of the connection. If the electrician did not run enough wire they may have put in the electrical box to hide their mistake which is not uncommon.

Easiest fix is to buy a different fixture but this is one example of why electricians need adult supervision. With my recent bath remodel I handed the electrician the wiring plan that include the exact location of the boxes for receptacles and switches and the guy mounted them 6 inches too low. Fortunately I always have a carpenter follow the electrical workers to fix dry wall damage and so could get the boxes moved higher and then repair the new drywall with new new drywall.
Your electrical advise about not needing a box is incorrect. The drywall cannot be one side. Installing the box was correct, not because the wire was too short.
 

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For a wall sconce a junction box is not required as the wires can be connected in the back of the sconce so there is sheetrock on one side and metal on the other side of the connection. If the electrician did not run enough wire they may have put in the electrical box to hide their mistake which is not uncommon.
What you are describing is a NEC violation.
 

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Arlington has 2 sconce boxes. Aifittings.com
 
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There are two sizes of octagon box.

The obsolete 3-1/2" box is 3" across the flats and 3-1/2" across the diagonals. The screws are 2-3/4" apart.

The modern 4" octagon box is 3-1/2" across the flats (arrrrgh, right?) and 4" across the diagonals. The screws are 3-1/4" apart.

You certainly should not be installing any more of the obsolete 3-1/2" boxes.

The industry is lousy with adapter plates that get you from 3-1/4" screws to 2-3/4" screws. I bought a $7 fixture to replace a chandelier I sold, and it came with one.
 
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