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:huh::wink::whistling2: Still watching---
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Amy, by sealant do you mean latex caulk? Is it sort of rubbery? If this is growing mold you should still be able to clean it off, but it might be time to remove it entirely and recaulk.
It is rubbery, yes. What would you use to clean it off? And if that doesn't work, do you have any tips on removing and replacing it?

It doesn't seem too difficult in my head but I'm still pretty much a DIY novice so who knows what might happen!
 

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It is rubbery, yes. What would you use to clean it off? And if that doesn't work, do you have any tips on removing and replacing it?

It doesn't seem too difficult in my head but I'm still pretty much a DIY novice so who knows what might happen!
You cut it off with a sharp utility knife.
Flat to both the floor and wall.
 

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I'm Your Huckleberry
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Install a higher cfm bathroom exhaust fan. If it's a builder's grade fan you may only have a 50 cfm as it's the smallest and cheapest. CFM refers to the amount of air the fan can move, extract.

You can install an 80 or a 100 cfm fan. Location of fan is also an issue. I've moved mine from above the toilet to over the shower itself. I as well have the tiny tiles all around the tub for about five foot up and have had serious mold issues on them as well as on the ceiling. My tub has the translucent sliding shower doors which I leave open as well as the bathroom door until the room is moisture free. I also leave the bathroom window, located on a tub wall to outside, open only a slight bit.

Problem solved for myself.

Also, Lysol works wonders.
 

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Doc Holliday said:
Install a higher cfm bathroom exhaust fan. If it's a builder's grade fan you may only have a 50 cfm as it's the smallest and cheapest. CFM refers to the amount of air the fan can move, extract.

You can install an 80 or a 100 cfm fan. Location of fan is also an issue. I've moved mine from above the toilet to over the shower itself. I as well have the tiny tiles all around the tub for about five foot up and have had serious mold issues on them as well as on the ceiling. My tub has the translucent sliding shower doors which I leave open as well as the bathroom door until the room is moisture free. I also leave the bathroom window, located on a tub wall to outside, open only a slight bit.

Problem solved for myself.

Also, Lysol works wonders.
Fans and lights above a shower should be rated for wet locations. And protected by a GCFI
 
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