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Discussion Starter #1
Hi

While mowing the lawn I’ve been noticing these moth like bugs flying up. Are they a sign of grubs or some thing else?

This year I’ve seen more of these moths on the sunnier parts of the lawn and those sections of the lawn have dead grass issue.

I’ve used a combination of grub control (Sevin, Scott’s grub ex and Bio advance grub killer plus) on the lawn from early June to August but I have still seen these moths and dying grass section. So I am puzzled if I still have a grub issue. I did apply two applications of fungal control as well throughout the season.

Please have a look at the pics and let me know what it could be?
Thanks





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And they fly up when you cut the grass ?

Just started seeing them recently (i.e September) ?

I think that's "sod webworm".
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've been seeing them in August too. I did the last grub treatment in mid August using Bio-advance grub killer plus.

So should I put something down again? Would that hurt the over seeding i did to some part of the lawn?




And they fly up when you cut the grass ?

Just started seeing them recently (i.e September) ?

I think that's "sod webworm".
 

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I am no expert, but sod webworm is different than grubs. Grub flying insect stage is more like a beetle.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone for replies. It's really helpful.
I'm surprised I have this issue in September.
I'm going to put down "Bioadvance Complete Insect Killer"; it has Bifenthrin and Carbaryl. It should handle sod webworm and other bugs as well.
I'll just get it from Lowe's tomorrow so I can put it down quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm not much of a grubologist but i suspect some species of grub.


If you could attract a pair of Eastern Phoebes you would have several hundred less each season.
I'm also interested in attracting the "Eastern Phoebes" as Senior mentioned. I'm going to look into this as well. I got plenty of scrap wood in the garage to make a bird house. I was reading different bird house types attract different species. Thanks for this suggestion.
 

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@007noob, how about a full monty shot of your lawn?

It looks gorgeous, from what I can see.

Yeah yeah, a bug here, and there, but.

On the other hand, you're a great lawn keeper, and we're here to help.
 

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The Phoebe seems to prefer nothing more than a platform attached to the under side of a soffit to protect from the weather so you should have plenty of scrap wood for other birds an their housing. The way i determined this was they first nested on the horizontal of the gutter down spout 35 + years ago and have been here every year since.


I placed this one just outside the dining window and could occasionally observe the activity for 16-17 days from hatching to fledging. They were here this year early, didn't nest here, but they are in the area and seen from time to time. They seem to know where the moth will be available with only a few days of observation. This has happened maybe 3 or 4 years of the 35 years. We humans need the lawn observation or the yard light to count millers/moth but they don't and can count down in the dirt.:biggrin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
@007noob, how about a full monty shot of your lawn?

It looks gorgeous, from what I can see.

Yeah yeah, a bug here, and there, but.

On the other hand, you're a great lawn keeper, and we're here to help.

Here is the front and backyard.
Can’t really see the bare spots from this angle. But there are patches of dried out grass and very thin lawn.







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Here is the front and backyard.
Can’t really see the bare spots from this angle. But there are patches of dried out grass and very thin lawn.
Thanks that puts things in context.

The big thing is that lawns and gardens are full of insects, some harmful, many not. It's not always easy to tell the difference.

In my time as a garden shop manager, I also helped people with their lawns and some people wanted to just spray first ask questions later, which I think is a totally wrong thing to do.

NOT saying that's your approach, by the way, just seeking a bigger picture.

That said, the little moth in one of your pictures could be a sod webworm, and, if that's the case, you might want to treat for it. The huge problem is that the caterpillars themselves are really hard to find as they're nocturnal.

Is there some way to get a better close up of the moth? I realize that's tough with a phone camera, but worth a try.

In order to help your problem, we need to know what it is. Sometimes we're down to guessing and trying various remedies, but I hate doing that unless there's no other way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When I upload on Tapatalk it uploads at best using medium quality (free users) and reduces the resolution to 576x1024.

I’ll upload a zoomed in version of the pictures - maybe that’ll show more details.





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When I upload on Tapatalk it uploads at best using medium quality (free users) and reduces the resolution to 576x1024.

I’ll upload a zoomed in version of the pictures - maybe that’ll show more details.





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Looks like Sod Webworm moth. Great picture!
 
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