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Ok so here is my (hopefully silly) question. The ceiling fan in my bedroom does not really put out too much light and it is the main source of light in our room. I think it is rated for a maximum of two 60 watt bulbs. Here is my question I was thinking about putting in like 100w equivalent cfl bulbs to brighten up the room a bit. I don't know the effective wattage on those bulbs but I imagine it is in the 25 to 30 range. Am I right to assume that the wattage is what is important in the fixtures? So that as long as I don't exceed the wattage I can get more light form the higher equivalent bulbs at a lower wattage...right?
 

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liscenced electrician
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you are correct. You can put a 60 watt bulb in there. If its a compact fluorescent that would have the light output of a 300watt incandescent. That would be really overkill, but a 26watt might brighten up your room a little bit. CFL bulbs have roughly 4 times the lumen output
 

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JOATMON
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you are correct. You can put a 60 watt bulb in there. If its a compact fluorescent that would have the light output of a 300watt incandescent. That would be really overkill, but a 26watt might brighten up your room a little bit. CFL bulbs have roughly 4 times the lumen output
jimmy is correct.

Now...with that said.....depending on the brand of CFL you buy, you may end up with one that has a warm up time that is more than you like. I wish I knew how to determine what it was before I bought them....about half of mine turn on instantly....the other half need about 30 seconds to reach full brightness.

I'm a big user of CFL's....and my electric bill reflects the benifits....

I would suggest starting with a 23w CFL....that is equivilant to about a 100w bulb.

The other thing to look at is color....unlike incandescents...you have about 3 different colors you can get a CFL in....Warm white, Day Light and Bright White....

As you will soon find out, these get listed as Kelvin...

Around 2700K is going to be your warm white....

Around the 4000K range is your daylight.....and bright white is around 6000+....those tend to have a blue tint to them.

My typical selection process for color is usually determined by what fixture it's going to be in. In my garage where I have 16 6" recessed cans....I'm using daylight....

If the lamp has a shade...we typically use warm white. In the bedrooms that have fixtures with 2 bulbs, we use one warm white and one daylight. The lamp fixture helps to blend the two colors.
 

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Ok so here is my (hopefully silly) question. The ceiling fan in my bedroom does not really put out too much light and it is the main source of light in our room. I think it is rated for a maximum of two 60 watt bulbs. Here is my question I was thinking about putting in like 100w equivalent cfl bulbs to brighten up the room a bit. I don't know the effective wattage on those bulbs but I imagine it is in the 25 to 30 range. Am I right to assume that the wattage is what is important in the fixtures? So that as long as I don't exceed the wattage I can get more light form the higher equivalent bulbs at a lower wattage...right?

A 100w equivelent cfl uses 20w.
 

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liscenced electrician
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Now...with that said.....depending on the brand of CFL you buy, you may end up with one that has a warm up time that is more than you like. I wish I knew how to determine what it was before I bought them....about half of mine turn on instantly....the other half need about 30 seconds to reach full brightness.
I was going to mention this. As far as i can tell, the higher the wattage, the longer they take to come one. I have 13w bulbs throughout my house, and they come on instantly. I used to have some 26watt ones that took a sec to come on. Some find it annoying, I didn't care.

As you will soon find out, these get listed as Kelvin...

This is kind of random, but many people don't know this, so i will share it. Kelven temperature rating reflects the color that steel (could be wrong about the material, but it doesn't really matter, the concept is the same). would be at a given temperate. You get steel to 2700 degrees and it is red hot, get it a little hotter and it starts turning more yellowish white. Hotter than that to 6500 and its white hot, get it hotter than that and it starts turning white blue.
 
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