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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I painted a room with a blue latex, semi gloss. The blue came out a little too dark and a little too shiney. I have a 1/2 gallon of flat white, same brand. If I mix it with the 1/2 gallon of blue semi gloss that I have left will it work OK? Can I just paint over the semi gloss on the wall, or will the mix not stick well?


Thanks for comments!
 

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You can mix them with no problems. Even better that it's the same brand. Start adding just a little of the white to the blue at a time. You will be surprised how a little bit of white will lighten up the blue. Just make sure you mix it well. When you think you have mixed it enough, you are about 1/3rd of the way there. Remember, you aren't just mixing two colors, you are mixing two sheens (Shines)
 

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I'd be a little weary about doing this. I've had it go bad more times than good, with the paint not having very good enamel holdout. The final finish was very uneven sheen-wise.
 

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I've done this once before painting, and it came out fine. I mixed several different brands and sheens of one company's latex interior paint and ended up with even color and gloss. Of course, I got the color I wanted because I worked at the paint store at the time and tinted each gallon to the right color before mixing :thumbup: Mistints are just great ($3 per gallon).

Painting semi-gloss is going to be the rub. If you painted no more than 1-2 days ago, you should be alright putting new paint on the wall. If more time has elapsed, then the semi-gloss on the wall will have coalesced (curing process for latex) and be reluctant to accept new paint. It is never recommended to recoat latex paint during the 2 days - 2 weeks window after painting - it will peel off.

Second, glossy paints are a :censored: to coat. Substrates are recommended to be clean, dry and dull, and uncured semi-gloss paints violate the dry and dull requirements.

The best system is to allow it to cure (2 weeks), use a de-glossing agent, and recoat. If that's a no-go, strip the uncured paint from the wall and repaint (re-prime if necessary).

Wall Paint - Beauty on a Budget
Wall Paint
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I painted it on Sunday. I would rather not wait 2 weeks to fix this.

Will it be OK if I pole sand, wipe down, and repaint? Will pole sanding de-gloss enough?

Or should I pole sand and prime before painting?

I will look into de-glossing agents.
 

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One thing I hadn't though of - maybe you could get a heater in the room to speed up the curing process. Even still, you run the risk of losing the topcoat, but it is better than waiting two weeks.

Pole sanding won't help unless you completely remove the existing topcoat. It will also be difficult because the paint is still wet below the very surface, and that will gum up your sanding pad. You may still be able to wash off the existing paint, but after four days it will be difficult as well.

If there is a small portion of the room that you can experiment with, get some Gloss-Off or other deglossing agent, and apply it to the wall as directed. If the paint doesn't come off, apply the mixed topcoat. If the paint does come off, then you've found a solvent weak enough to remove the paint without damaging the primer.
 

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Sanding at this point will ony risk damaging your first coat untill it has cured.
 
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