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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I'm trimming up several rooms in our house using a Dewalt 12" miter saw, and ran into an issue today. I've already installed crown (painted maple) and baseboards (pine with quarter round), in one room without incident. Today while cutting oak quarter round, 0 degree cuts were fine, but whenever I did my 45 degree cuts for corners, the wood would "catch", splinter, torque the length that I'm holding violently, and shoot fragments behind the saw, resulting in a ruined length of quarter round and a startled me. I tried to slow down my cut, but the same thing happened. I'm making sure that the material is solidly against the fence. My blade is new and not visibly warped.

I'm pretty new to the DIY field, and things were going well and I was enjoying the work until this, which has taken a little wind out of my sails. I want to make sure that I'm using the saw properly and safely before I continue.

Thanks so much for your help!
 

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the Musigician
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How many teeth in the blade you're using? Is it a rip/crosscut blade or a trim blade?

DM
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
How was it positioned on the table/fence?
Positioned with the right angle firmly against the fence. I tried with the end that I'm not bracing just past the blade so that it's not against the opposite fence, and also so it's against the opposite fence, with similar results.
 

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KemoSabe
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I like to use a sacrificial piece of material against the fence when cutting small trim profiles. Most times the air movement caused by the spinning blade is enough to draw a small cut-off into the gap between the fence components and ruin the moment.:laughing:
 

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the Musigician
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I tried to slow down my cut, but the same thing happened. I'm making sure that the material is solidly against the fence. My blade is new and not visibly warped.
hmmmm.... you pretty much covered anything else I can think of.


DM
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I like to use a sacrificial piece of material against the fence when cutting small trim profiles. Most times the air movement caused by the spinning blade is enough to draw a small cut-off into the gap between the fence components and ruin the moment.:laughing:
This sounds like a good idea. I'll give it a shot. Thanks!
 

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I have a 12" sliding Dewalt with a Diablo 90+ tooth fine finish trim blade. I was having chip out trouble with pre-finished maple trim. I tried everything and still chip out.

To solve this believe it or not, I bought a single bevel Dewalt 10" and cut the same trim with the blade that comes on the saw perfectly! The 10" turns about 1000 rpm higher, and a hell of a lot less torque.

I now use the 10" saw for all the trim that will fit. The 12" is for construction only.
 

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I have a 12" Dewalt sliding compound saw and have never had any problems other than using an undersized extension cord which produced a noticeable drop in speed at the saw.
 

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I normally do as well, but I did try to use a cheap cord once and had this happen so I thought I would share. Most of my cords on site are 10 gauge monsters, so not a problem. Sometimes we get comfy with things as I did and just took the first cord closest to me, lesson learned.
 

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Loneframer is dead on, I also have the 12 Dewalt 708 and have the same problem no matter what blade I use. I always take 2 pieces of 3/4 plywood 3 inches tall and the length of the saw table and screw, one to the edge of the other piece of plywood forming a 90° bed like is on the miter saw. I clamp the plywood onto the bed of the miter saw and cut the small trim on the plywood. Not only does it not sling parts all over the place the plywood gives you a good reference point to cut the trim from.

The reason it slings the small pieces is the piece has no support on the back after being cut, and will move while the blade is spinning and the blade will catch it and throw it. It will startle you if you aren't expecting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Loneframer is dead on, I also have the 12 Dewalt 708 and have the same problem no matter what blade I use. I always take 2 pieces of 3/4 plywood 3 inches tall and the length of the saw table and screw, one to the edge of the other piece of plywood forming a 90° bed like is on the miter saw. I clamp the plywood onto the bed of the miter saw and cut the small trim on the plywood. Not only does it not sling parts all over the place the plywood gives you a good reference point to cut the trim from.

The reason it slings the small pieces is the piece has no support on the back after being cut, and will move while the blade is spinning and the blade will catch it and throw it. It will startle you if you aren't expecting it.
I started using a piece of 3/4 plywood behind the trim and have had many fewer problems.

Learn something new every day! Thanks to everyone for the help and I'm sure I'll be back on here soon with more questions.
 

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Remember what Lone said about letting the blade stop before raising it---
 
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Crusty Old Dude
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Remember what Lone said about letting the blade stop before raising it---

Or you can pull the piece away from the blade after it is cut before letting go of the trigger. I always use a sacrificial fence setup for small moldings, I always called it a "shooting board"
 

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Or you can pull the piece away from the blade after it is cut before letting go of the trigger. I always use a sacrificial fence setup for small moldings, I always called it a "shooting board"
But the small piece will still be there to get slung to who knows where.
 

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I like to use a sacrificial piece of material against the fence when cutting small trim profiles. Most times the air movement caused by the spinning blade is enough to draw a small cut-off into the gap between the fence components and ruin the moment.:laughing:
Exactly what I do:thumbsup:
 

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Loneframer is dead on, I also have the 12 Dewalt 708 and have the same problem no matter what blade I use. I always take 2 pieces of 3/4 plywood 3 inches tall and the length of the saw table and screw, one to the edge of the other piece of plywood forming a 90° bed like is on the miter saw. I clamp the plywood onto the bed of the miter saw and cut the small trim on the plywood. Not only does it not sling parts all over the place the plywood gives you a good reference point to cut the trim from.

The reason it slings the small pieces is the piece has no support on the back after being cut, and will move while the blade is spinning and the blade will catch it and throw it. It will startle you if you aren't expecting it.
Yes, I had a similar problem years ago. I started using one of those wood holder things that you could move up and down so that the wood wouldn't move after or during the cut. I didn't have much problem after that. I tried to find a picture, but IDK what they're called to show you. It's basically a saw horse with the height being adjustable, so however tall your saw is, you match the height and set your wood on that and it feeds it to you.
 
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