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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
have been meaning to ask this for a few days...

First, I followed all of the directions in manual about checking that the
1. miter table was square to the fence and
2. that the blade was square to the table and to the fence.
3. I also had the pieces clamped when I made the cuts, so no movement.

everything seems fine.

Nevertheless, when I bevel cut on a 45 degree angle and try to fit the two pieces together they don't fit perfectly. It looks to me like the cut if off a bit.
i'll try to take a few pics to illustrate.
 

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It will be useful to tell us what saw you have. Bosch,for instance, has a one piece fence that gets warped and no adjusting in the world will fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i have a ryobi 10" compound miter saw....


when i did a scarf joint at a 45 across the face of the piece (moving the miter table this time), it lined up perfectly...but with the bevel at 45, it does not fit as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
"Use a known good angel to set your blade and don't rely on the gauge that is on the saw they are never right."

excuse my ignorance here. if I am not changing the bevel setting, shouldn't everything line up. I did this on a few pieces of scrap. Cut a 45 degree bevel in piece A. Then got another piece (B), set it up so that it would slide under the first bevel (never changed the bevel setting) and it didn't line up 100%. I understand on long runs there a variety of reasons a scarf joint like this might not line up perfectly, but on a short test piece, shouldn't they?
 

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Something somewhere is moving! I have used inexpensive (thin) blades in the past that actually flex and cause the issue you are talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
here's a pic, after making a 45 degree cut...this is really off. right?




but when i make a straight cut with no bevel. i am pretty sure it's on. i should test that and take a pic.
 

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That is either blade warp or you are not lined up right. The top edge is slanted which means your horizontal axis is not at 0 for a true 90degree cut. Like others have said above, the 0 on the saw may not actually be 0.

Try turning the horizontally adjustments slightly and cut very slowly to minimize blade warp.
 

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I believe that what he is saying is that the blade is true vertical when he has it set for a 90 degree cut, but when he angles the blade to 45 degrees the vertical changes. Sounds like something is bent, worn, or the tolerances are sptherwise not tight enough, which may go back to a design issue.
 

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I believe that what he is saying is that the blade is true vertical when he has it set for a 90 degree cut, but when he angles the blade to 45 degrees the vertical changes. Sounds like something is bent, worn, or the tolerances are sptherwise not tight enough, which may go back to a design issue.
Ahhh, sounds like a Ryobi design issue....Gonna have to figure out the "character" that is inherent in all "cheap" tools. Make minor adjustments to the direction that it's off and make test cuts. once you get it right, take a sharpie or an awl and mark it yourself so next time you'll know where to be for a proper cut.

I have Ryobi drill that loves to occasionally play dead. It has billowed smoke and shot sparks from the brushes, but it keeps on trucking...$40 drill that would drive a professional nuts, but for my once a week use I can't bring myself to throw it away since it still rotates...
 

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Sorry, I can't help with your problem. But in my experience, Ryobi power tools are junk.
Total Junk...old sparky will be my one and only piece of Ryobi equipment unless of course someone donates something :yes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
update.....


after the fact, i realized i was cutting the molding with the wrong blade, the blade i was using for the thicker Azek I've been cutting. Duh!!


also, i performed the bevel setting test described here. and I was able to put a frame together square, no gaps. some chip out though.




I did have to hold these pieces upright against the fence, as opposed to flat on the table, the way I was cutting the molding. not sure if that makes a difference.
 

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Stairguy
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it probably has to do with the orange throat plate insert. It is flexing when you are making your bevel. Put a piece of solid material down like a piece of plywood and then make your cut on top of that. Ill bet you that is the problem. It has nothing to do with your settings.
 

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Have you checked it for square?

Pull down and lock the blade then set a framing square against the fence and the blade and see what you have. Don’t know if that saw even can be adjusted but if it can use the square to do it.

If it can’t as long as you make your first cut on the one side of the blade and the second cut on the other side of the blade the your crazy angle should join up just fine.

I wouldn’t get to upset with the saw since it’s one of the cheapest on the market. You shouldn’t expect pro results with a $89 chop saw.
 

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Stairguy
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i missed the second page of post before i made my above comment. However, it does support what i said. If you were using a dull blade it was taking a lot of force to push the saw through, causing the plastic throat plate to bend. A piece of plywood under your work piece will also help with the tear out.
 
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