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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I’m going to be finishing a 500 sq ft space on the second floor of my garage and attaching it to the house. A builder suggested a mini split system for heat and A/C (I’m located in CT), and it seems like this would be a sensible solution. After some research and looking at options online, the single-zone Mitsubishi 12K BTU ceiling cassette system is my top contender. (SUZ-KA12NA.TH + SLZ-KA12NA.TH)

It seems that there isn’t a ton of reviews/opinions published about ceiling cassette systems in general, let alone the Mitsubishi ones specifically, so I was curious if anyone had any experience or opinions on this. I would also welcome any installation or setup tips or potential problems to look out for. There will be plenty of room above the unit and the ceiling will be drywalled.

I do understand that these are a bit more expensive and are not as easy to install as the wall-mounted models, but I’m willing to make those concessions.

Thanks in advance for any advice, tips, or opinions! :thumbsup: Also, does 12K BTU sound about right?
 

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Make sure it will still heat at your design temps. many stop heating at 0 or -13.
 

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load

If its rated for below zero it is probably an inverter system therefore pretty darned efficient. 12,000 BTU sounds just right. I might even contemplate an 18,000 BTU unit for those hard to heat nights. The inverter will allow it to pace itself for inside load conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the feedback, guys... :thumbsup:

I do plan to work with an HVAC professional on this to ensure proper sizing and installation; I just wanted to do some advanced research and homework. Thanks again!
 

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... therefore pretty darned efficient.
The high wall indoor boxes are the most efficient (COP/SEER) judging from the manufacturers' numbers. The short-ducted and ceiling boxes are just not up to the same level for some reason.

The inverter will allow it to pace itself for inside load conditions.
This is not an issue for the OP, but the outdoor/compressor sections for multiple indoor equipment can't run a single indoor unit to as low a level as the 1:1 systems according to the data I have seen. They are just bigger so it is inherent. That might be something to keep in mind when installing a system with one single and a multi and you can choose where to put the single system -- where it might be running at low levels a lot of the time. (Think bedroom at night.)
 
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