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My GE Microwave oven model JVM1653SH06 stopped working after a power surge. The GE repair person looked at it and said the circuit board was blown out, but he couldn't order the part because it was too old. I found the circuit board on ebay and watched enough YouTube videos to figure out how to replace it myself. The old one had a clear burn mark on it, and the new one looked identical (other than the burn mark), so I'm sure he was right about the old one being blown and I'm sure I had the right replacement. But after I put everything back together and plugged it in, it still didn't work. When I first put the new one in, the LCD panel was still completely off but we could push the buttons and cook things, so it seemed like maybe there was just a loose connection in the LCD panel, so I took it apart again and jiggled all the wires, and after that it didn't work at all. I also checked the connectivity of the ceramic fuse and all the thermal fuses I could find, and they all seemed fine. And yes, the power supply works. What else could be wrong?
 

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I second this comment, I've been down that road and unfortunately sooner or not that later I end up upgrading my microwave to a new one. Unless there's an special sentiment value attach it, it's in your best interest to get a new one. :)
 

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Bought an Amana microwave back in 1978 as a second anniversary gift for the ex.

Paid $750.00 for it.

8 years later it stopped working.

Bought a new control board costing $200.00.

Installed the board and got another year out of it.

Ditched the microwave and the ex.

Bought a new GE that did twice as much and higher powered for $150.00

Should have just bought a new on rather than try to fix the Amana, but it did have sentimental value at the time.
 

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Last chance if there are any cables with plugs etc. many have small pins and sockets. check inside them to see if any of the connections are bent, dirty, etc. It sounds like there is a bad connection.
 

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I learned long ago when VFD's came to my world. When the control board goes it can and usually does take other equipment with it.
On the old drives we had a control board, a mother board and line and load IBGT's ( power transistors. Cost of a new drive was over $400grand, cost of replacing all of the replaceable parts around $20 grand. We found out quickly replace it all and we had a better chance of it working correctly for a long time. Go part way with replacement parts and there were the midnight phone calls it broke again. Those did no one any good.

Bite the bullet get a new microwave. Pretty easy to install. Have you installed a surge arrestor on your electrical panel and at the location needed for the microwave?

I am finishing my new home and have started looking for a gas range with NO ELECTRONICS.
I know how to set a timer, and do not need a clock on the stove. Not having much luck, may have to buy an old one replace all the parts for longevity.
 

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I learned long ago when VFD's came to my world. When the control board goes it can and usually does take other equipment with it.
On the old drives we had a control board, a mother board and line and load IBGT's ( power transistors. Cost of a new drive was over $400grand, cost of replacing all of the replaceable parts around $20 grand. We found out quickly replace it all and we had a better chance of it working correctly for a long time. Go part way with replacement parts and there were the midnight phone calls it broke again. Those did no one any good.

Bite the bullet get a new microwave. Pretty easy to install. Have you installed a surge arrestor on your electrical panel and at the location needed for the microwave?

I am finishing my new home and have started looking for a gas range with NO ELECTRONICS.
I know how to set a timer, and do not need a clock on the stove. Not having much luck, may have to buy an old one replace all the parts for longevity.
For want of a nail a horseshoe was lost, for the want of a horseshoe a horse was lost -----
 

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When you said the fuses were fine, what did you mean? Did they look fine, they were not burnt up? Or did you actually check them, to be sure electricity was passing through them? You may need a voltmeter to check continuity, to be sure the fuses are working the way they should.
I just replaced a fuse on my electric dryer. It looked fine but electricity was not passing through it.
 
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