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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In a recently purchased home I have a 1" supply coming in from the street to a ⅝ meter, then sizing up again to ¾.
I'm wondering if this is correct or should there be a 1" meter to match the supply and avoid the loss of pressure?
 

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Naildriver
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Pressure is pressure. Volume is what you are losing. It all should be 1" until a final neck down to your filters or water heater connections and beyond.
 
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Does the typical homeowner need a 1" meter or even 3/4" meter? I think standard is 5/8". Larger meters cost more at install and have higher monthly minimum charge. My guess is the house usage would be fine with 5/8" but sprinkler or pool filling might need larger?
 

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In a recently purchased home I have a 1" supply coming in from the street to a ⅝, meter then sizing up again to ¾.
I'm wondering if this is correct or should there be a 1" meter to match the supply and avoid the loss of pressure?
Do you have an issue or just curious? Nothing wrong with the meter being smaller than the service if the system is sized properly. The sizing charts in codes do show meters smaller than the building supply
 

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Per the article "Due to intermittent use of the fixtures in a water supply system it can be difficult to predict and size the supply and service lines. The fixtures total theoretical demand should always be compensated with a statistic more expected demand. "
"With the Water Supply Fixture Units (WSFU) system defined by the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) there are tables available where the total demand calculated by adding each units "Water Supply Fixture Units" (WFSU) are compensated to an expected demand."

So the WFSU seems to say 'expected demand' is an important consideration. Recently when I was in discussion with plumbing company I expressed desire for standard size meter rather than larger meter they were incorporating in the plan. Initial cost and recurring cost is significantly higher for larger meter. I think they installed an oversized meter for me last time because they ignored expected demand. They only count fixtures. But obviously every shower won't be showering and every toilet won't be flushing at the same time. He acted like counting was the extent of his ability and considering demand was beyond his ability. I removed his company from my supplier list.
 
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