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Discussion Starter #1
Up here in Alberta it is very hard to get an estimated price on how contractors charge to install metal roofing. Anybody know the going rate. I have been quoted from $4sq/ft to $13/sqft. Thanks for any input.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
ya I know

Ya I know it depends on a lot of stuff, My roof pitch is a 7/12 with 1 dormer out each side that are 4/12. Right now there are old ashalt shingles and my plan is to have them stripped off so the contractor just has to come in and lay the metal roof on, It is corrogated flat seam tin that is going to be held in place with screws. Are there any advantages to laying strapping over the roof deck to fasten screws to other than I will be able to hit a truss when i nail down the strapping then the tin will be fastened to the strapping instead of the osb. I will be purchasing the tin as well.
Thanks, what else does it depend on.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks very much for being so quick out of the chute to answer this question once I gave you a little "depends" there Tom. Don't worry about it, I hired a guy for $6.50 a sq/ft.
 

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We bought a house with a metal roof with the screws and gaskets.
I think the mfr. preferred screwing it right onto the roof deck if possible.
We also screened in our deck and had a roof put on to match the house.
In my reading of the mfr literature, there are a bunch of different shaped pieces for different things. I'm thinking it might be best to have the roofer buy the material, but I'm no expert.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks velvet, oh I know there are a lot of different style flashings out there, we just want plain jane roof edge and fascia. It just would have been nice to know if I was paying my guy to much or not enough.
 

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With any system that relies on exposed neoprene washers, whatever price you are paying is too much once the neoprene deteriorates from the UV rays of the sun and permits full spread leakage at all of the newly uncovered holes.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the reply Ed, what is the lifespan of the neoprene washers if you don't mind me asking.
 

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I don't know exactly at which point they fail to the point of leakage, because a lot of that would deal with the torque applied during the fastening and how much of the rubber bushing flattened out beyond the metal washer component.

I do know that some roofing contractors heavily market elasomeric roofing repairs specifically for these style of installations, and due to the replacement costs associated with the metal roof panel R & R, their picking are pretty easy.

So, as a best "Guess" I would venture 10 years for deterioration at the early stages, barring no other fastening malfunction and around 20 years for significant UV deterioration.

This is from personal observations and no actual studies I have read, Yet, but now I will.

A concealed fastening system, (ie; Standing Seam, Batten Seam, Unilock Seam, etc...), would offer a much better value, even if the initial costs to install are greater than the exposed fastener systyems.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you Ed for the Info. when you say initial install is more with the standing seam, etc. How much more. Thanks Tom for the info but it seems like more and more residential houses are going to the screw down panels especially on anything over a 4/12.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
That's nice looking stuff there velvet do you know if the mft recommends an ice and water shield to be applied to the entire roof before laying tin. Reason I ask is that one of our neighbors is getting there house done in tin and the entire roof deck is covered with that Grace ice and water shield with the plastic looking covering on it.
 

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I was just reading this: http://www.fabral.com/technical/Residential.pdf .
They seem to like that stuff for shallow applications and valleys and such, but it can't seem to hurt.
That document I linked to says they prefer 5/8" plywood roof decking, as opposed to osb or flake board (not that I could identify the difference :) because of the lessened screw-holding capability, over time. They said that the torque required when screwing down the roof on thinner osb is just about the same as to rip it out, so that's no good! They say to use furring strips if those materials are used.
 

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I did wind up doing a little research last night as promised and found all sorts of information from Metal Panel Manufacturers that supported my position.

Here are some points for clarification.

If the initial screws are torqued down too tight, the wood decking can be stripped so the screw threads lose their pull-out resistance. Also, the hole gets widened in the metal panel allowing for a higher potential of leaks in the future. Along with that, the neoprene gasket does get compressed and pushed out from the protective covering of the steel washer being allowed to be exposed to the UV rays of the Sun to allow quicker deterioration.

The holes, since they are circular, do not allow for movement due to expansion and contraction of the panels. Eventually, after enough toggling motion, the screws will back out with time.

A hidden fastener with loose free floating clip attachments would allow for the panel movement.

Not all screws and neoprene gaskets are rated equally. The stuff carried at Home Depot or Lowes do not meet the manufacturers specifications. Some screws rust prematurely and the gasket disintegrates from the sun.

If you are going to use a product for an under-layment, you should use the HT, (High Temperature), version since the metal panels get exceptionally hot from the sun and the other version of Ice and Water Shield will deteriorate.

Check out catalogs from MBCI and Atas metal manufacturing for unique specifications that should be considered for any panel installation.

If firring strips are used, they should be made of pressure treated wood so they do not decay. There will be condensation that forms under the panels. They should also either be shimmed or have routered weep holes to allow the condensation to pass before it accumulates at the wood obstruction.

Ed
 

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Fabral says this:

Use of furring/purlins - Non-treated lumber should be used for furring/purlins. Treated lumber can have a variety of harmful substances that are incompatible with metal roofing. If treated lumber is used, a separation should be provided between the metal and the wood. This can be plastic sheeting, builders felt or bituminous paint. Please refer to Fabral Technical Bulletin #803 for additional information on treated lumber.
 

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actually your better off using galvanized z channel for the purlins
there is added flexibility,as the panels move the z can flex taking alot of stress off the fasteners

i think roof hugger is a company that offers a vented z
 
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