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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here's the story... My kitchen was NOT in need of any work but plumbing went out, ins got involved, restoration company came to save the day. Countertops removed were professionally installed over plywood. The plywd was cut in sections to match my kitchen cabinet layout. They were removed and pieces were saved by RESTORATION company workers. Long story short they replaced them with MDF. YES, Formica and other laminating companies would like MDF used but I think that is largely pushed for money making purposes. MDF will fail. Most homeowners don't make it a point to routinely seal the sink! The workmanship on my mdf was horrible. There were 5 seams around the sink alone. NO seal under the MDf protecting it from the steam during HEAT DRY cycle. 2 seams in the backsplash around the window making that wall appear installed in 3 sections. Oh and 1 seam in the middle of the counter. Needless to say I demanded all of it OUT and now getting granite. Here's the question, does anyone agree that laminate manufacturers request and recommend installation of their product on Mdf as an effort to keep homeowners buying new counters WHEN they fail? ( Formica company offers a 1 year warranty on their product and strongly suggest you NOT use Plywood hmmmmmm)

PS. I have read up on the problems with plywood however, I have not experienced any of it with my counters or the counters of older homes we used to renovate!!!
 

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Tileguy
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It is a matter of cost and tooling. Counter top manufacturers can not compete with their counterparts if they aren't all using the same material. Particleboard is much less expensive than plywood these days. Technically, not any plywood will do and the higher quality plywood that would be necessary has even a higher cost than just any ole plywood. Particleboard is also somewhat easier to tool and deal with I suppose.:)

As far as the multitude of seams, I don't know why that would be. Inexperience maybe?:)

Keep in mind restoration companies are more "jacks of all trades" rather than experts at anything. They try to maximize sales (as does everybody) by being all things to all people. Then they also have the problem of finding qualified employees. True tradesmen are rapidly becoming a thing of the past. Maybe they have already.

The path of least resistance is the name of the game these days, get in, get it done, get out, damn the quality control.:yes:
 

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Here's the story... My kitchen was NOT in need of any work but plumbing went out, ins got involved, restoration company came to save the day. Countertops removed were professionally installed over plywood. The plywd was cut in sections to match my kitchen cabinet layout. They were removed and pieces were saved by RESTORATION company workers. Long story short they replaced them with MDF. YES, Formica and other laminating companies would like MDF used but I think that is largely pushed for money making purposes. MDF will fail. Most homeowners don't make it a point to routinely seal the sink! The workmanship on my mdf was horrible. There were 5 seams around the sink alone. NO seal under the MDf protecting it from the steam during HEAT DRY cycle. 2 seams in the backsplash around the window making that wall appear installed in 3 sections. Oh and 1 seam in the middle of the counter. Needless to say I demanded all of it OUT and now getting granite. Here's the question, does anyone agree that laminate manufacturers request and recommend installation of their product on Mdf as an effort to keep homeowners buying new counters WHEN they fail? ( Formica company offers a 1 year warranty on their product and strongly suggest you NOT use Plywood hmmmmmm)

PS. I have read up on the problems with plywood however, I have not experienced any of it with my counters or the counters of older homes we used to renovate!!!
I don't understand this post.
Was the formica laminated to plywood initially?
Were they then cut up and "saved"
But when they came back, they were installed on MDF?
And they put this jigsaw puzzle back on the cabinets?
Is this what happened?
 
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