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I'm expanding my kitchen into an adjacent room by busting out a wall, and pondering what to do about the flooring. The adjacent room has 1 1/2-inch wide oak (the same as in the rest of the house), and the kitchen has heart pine. (See photo - the wall to the left will be removed.) Obviously these can't go together in the same room.

One option is redoing both areas with tile (which my wife favors), but I will need to go over the old plank subfloor with plywood, then cement board, then tile - sounds like a real pain, and it will raise the floor height a half-inch or so. I'm also a little scared that after all that work, the tile will end up cracking.

The other option is to match the existing oak floors. I would need to find the closest wood to match (unfinished) and then get someone to refinish the whole space so they match. My question is, will they match anyway? I'll hire someone to do the finishing, so if they sand the old floor down to bare wood, will they be able to finish the new and old so they match? Any tips for how I might go about doing this? Thanks!
 

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A good floor man should not have a problem matching the finish.The problem I see from the picture is the quality of the original oak.It was not matched well.A lot of sapwood mixed with heartwood and different cuts of the wood.Some rift and some quartered and some flat sawn.This will make it hard to match the look of the old and has nothing to do with the finish.
 

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Interesting, I hadn't thought of that. I did notice a mix of sawing patterns, but I assumed that was typical.

If I were your client, what would you advise - try to match the existing oak, or tear it out and put tile in both rooms?

Thanks!
 

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I'm biased.I love the old wood floors .If you can find an experienced flooring contractor in your area that has been around for some years he can blend them in .May even have a stash in his shop to mix and match with.The problem these days is finding such a person and one you can trust to do it right.
 

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If you can't find someone to match what you have, you might want to consider engineered flooring for both rooms, just a thought.
 

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How thick is the old oak flooring?

In the 1940 there was the first generation of thin cheaper flooring---if it's 3/4" you may be able to find a match--if it is the thin stock---you may be in trouble.
 
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