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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've recently finished up remodeling my master bath, from a tight 4x6 to a 11x7.

Had to replace some rotten 1x6 tg plank. Cut out the section that was rotted and replaced it with OSB @ 3/4, then laid a 1/2 sanded plywood down and now I'm ready to start laying the hardi or cement board then tile.

I'v heard some mixed reviews about the application techniques used for this job.

One guy says "use sanded ply of the floor, lay your mastic then tile it, the shower you could use either cement board or hardi then tile." "if you use cement board on th floor the sanded ply will wick and rot"

Another says, "lay hardi on the floor and durock in the shower."

Can someone as another "professional/real world tested" method share ther experiences with this?

What's the right answer? Any help would be appreciated!:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
This guy has no clue.

Hardie IS cementboard, use it or any cementboard you like on the walls in wet areas and floors, use thinset, NO Mastic.
I figured as much but this is really my first tile job (outside of a basic kitchen backsplash) and I'm open to suggestions and real world applications.

thanks for the reply, just to be clear, I should use durock or hardi for the floors as well as the shower?

I guess I'm confused if I should be laying hardi or cement board on the floors (outside the shower) that may get a little wet from me scrubba-dub-dubbin in the shower.

What would prevent me from just doing the whole bathroom in hardi or durock? Would it be $$$?

For the ceilings I planned to use densarmour. What are your thoughts on that?
 

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I used 1/4" hardibacker on horizontal tiled surfaces, and 1/2" durock on vertical. The 1/4" stuff was more like a fiberboard and much easier to work with, but you can use 1/2" as well if you really want. You really shouldn't use anything less than 1/2" on walls, however. Different people have different experiences with different brands and types of products, but as far as I can tell, there's no reason you shouldn't use either of the products you mentioned. And each product will give you specific installation instructions on their websites.

DensArmor is good for the ceilings, or anywhere else in a damp area like a bathroom, but probably a bit more expensive than regular greenboard. I hear it works better, too. But there's nothing wrong with using greenboard if the area is ventilated well enough.
 
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