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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
this is how I have been doing Smashed Taters for the freezer.

first step, of course, is to peel and cube the taters. boil in appropriate size pot.
in a separate pan, poach a large diced onion to help diminish the strong flavor. (if desired).
after boiling potatoes, drain well, add a stick (or two) of butter and the poached onions,
add spices to taste (garlic powder, salt/pepper, etc.)
smash it all up well, allow to cool, and let sit covered overnight on the stove.
don't add any additional moisture to the mix - (dry is easier to handle)
next day, form the potatoes into baseball size balls: 5 ~ 6 ounces is a good single portion size.
put on cookie sheet, freeze solid, store the potato balls in a zip-top bag in the freezer.
when ready to serve, place frozen ball in small dish and defrost. after defrosting, add
a little liquid of your choice (water, broth, cream, etc). to bring it up to the desired consistency, heat, mix well and cover with gravy.
just one less thing to make when having a small plate of fried chicken or country fried steak-n-biscuits.

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JUSTA MEMBER
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this is how I have been doing Smashed Taters for the freezer.

first step, of course, is to peel and cube the taters.
boil in appropriate size pot. (key to common sizes is to weigh the empty pot first).
in a separate pan, poach a large diced onion to help diminish the strong flavor. (if desired).
after boiling potatoes, drain well, add a stick (or two) of butter and the poached onions,
add spices to taste (garlic powder, salt/pepper, etc.)
smash it all up well, allow to cool, and let sit covered overnight on the stove.
don't add any additional moisture to the mix - (dry is easier to handle)
next day, form the potatoes into baseball size balls: 5 ~ 6 ounces is a good single portion size.
put on cookie sheet, freeze solid, store the potato balls in a zip-top bag in the freezer.
when ready to serve, place frozen ball in small dish and defrost. after defrosting, add
a little liquid of your choice (water, broth, cream, etc). to bring it up to the desired consistency.
just one less thing to make when having a small plate of fried chicken or country fried steak-n-biscuits.

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View attachment 651634

Good idea, but I would change a few things to suit myself, as would anyone else.

I never thought of making tater balls.

I just buy little freezer containers with lids.

They make fine dishes to eat the thawed and nuked item from.

Buy Chile in a giant can, and divide it up into 10 or more 8 oz containers, freeze what I won't eat today, thaw one at a time later.

Chile is cheaper per oz in a gallon size can, than buying individual singles.

And plenty of other foods are the same way, Cook in bulk, and save the excess in the freezer, GENIUS.

ED
 

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I usually go to Maine every fall (not last year due to COVID) and buy 2 100# bags of potatoes (1 Russet, 1 Katahdin). I store the bags in a cool dark place but when they start to sprout, it is time to freeze what is left for mashed potatoes. I cut into approx. 1-1.5" cubes (as close to uniform size as possible) Boil until just tender, drain and mash with no liquid or flavorings added. Freeze in quart size freezer bags. When you want to eat, thaw, heat and add little butter, milk, salt and pepper. I sometimes add some roasted mashed garlic.

I misspoke in this post, I buy 50# bags not 100#.
 

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I worked with a guy that liked sauerkraut in his mash potatoes. He was German heritage. He called them smashed potatoes also.
 
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You can boil smaller potatoes whole, or cut in halves or quarters for larger potatoes before boiling. The skin comes right off & saves the work of peeling. Or, of course, leave it on if you like the skin.
 

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this is how I have been doing Smashed Taters for the freezer.

first step, of course, is to peel and cube the taters. boil in appropriate size pot.
in a separate pan, poach a large diced onion to help diminish the strong flavor. (if desired).
after boiling potatoes, drain well, add a stick (or two) of butter and the poached onions,
add spices to taste (garlic powder, salt/pepper, etc.)
smash it all up well, allow to cool, and let sit covered overnight on the stove.
don't add any additional moisture to the mix - (dry is easier to handle)
next day, form the potatoes into baseball size balls: 5 ~ 6 ounces is a good single portion size.
put on cookie sheet, freeze solid, store the potato balls in a zip-top bag in the freezer.
when ready to serve, place frozen ball in small dish and defrost. after defrosting, add
a little liquid of your choice (water, broth, cream, etc). to bring it up to the desired consistency, heat, mix well and cover with gravy.
just one less thing to make when having a small plate of fried chicken or country fried steak-n-biscuits.

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I’d kill for that plate of food right about now!

Did you make that gravy.
 

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A "Handy Husband"
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I’ll try that. My frozen mashed potatoes are watery, like I made mashed potatoes with water instead of milk.
That is why I never add liquid before I freeze them. Boil , drain while they cool, mash, bag and freeze. Add liquids of choice when you thaw to use. Try using some low fat chicken stock. Wife makes her own stock.
 

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Lawdy lawdy mashed, smashed, trashed, thrashed, re-hashed, etc. taters are soooo good whatever you want to call them.

Great recipe @John Smith_inFL !

Maybe swap out the garlic powder and instead take the time to toast some garlic to a golden color, then toss the flakes in, along with the bit of oil you cooked them in.

And, add some ripe, even overripe Roma or beefsteak tomatoes. Enough to give it a faint orangey or rusty color.

So good. They get inhaled at a potluck . . .
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I am in the South - I have never, ever seen tomatoes in mashed potatoes.
and, I am not a fan of garlic chunks in anything - the powdered flavor is fine for me.
thanks for the warnings - just in case I ever venture into you guys' neck of the woods.
 

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I am in the South - I have never, ever seen tomatoes in mashed potatoes.
and, I am not a fan of garlic chunks in anything - the powdered flavor is fine for me.
thanks for the warnings - just in case I ever venture into you guys' neck of the woods.
I meant grated garlic. Try the tomatoes!
 

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I love potatoes, but, I'm always surprised at how high they can raise a blood sugar. I think it's called Glycemic Load. They're higher than a doughnut!

I didn't know they have lower carb potatoes!
 

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I love potatoes, but, I'm always surprised at how high they can raise a blood sugar. I think it's called Glycemic Load.

I didn't know they have lower carb potatoes!
Sounds like a contradiction in terms, like "lard with no saturated fats" which someone jokingly pushed back in the 1970s.
 

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Sounds like a contradiction in terms, like "lard with no saturated fats" which someone jokingly pushed back in the 1970s.
Well, no. It would be like sweet corn vs less sweet corn, I think. Corn flavor isn't just the sweet or you could just have sugar on your plate.

Glycemic Index is regarding what really pushes your blood sugar up. I'm not Diabetic, but, I try to watch it.
 

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Yeah, @Nik333 you have a point, wrenching back on track . . .

Try some chinese or regular chives in the taters, enough to turn 'em green. Salivating all over the keyboard, squish, squish, squish, squish, squish, squish, squish, squish, squish, squish, etc,
 
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