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I want to make the doors for my Tropic Home. I will be using teak and can get it cut in any dimensioons, but am thinking 1 1/2" x 5" and 3/4" x 4"(or 5"). My tools are limited to a small table saw, circular saw, electric hand planer, router, drill, chop saw, biscut jointer and some clamps. I like a rustic look, but want a good, solid secure door. I am going to have to make 13 of them. I've attached a sketch of a few ideas, but am open to any other ideas. What I am most unsure of is the joints. Will a single biscut in the corner be strong enough? Biscuts to secure the center panel? Also glueing the faces of two 3/4" to make 1 1/2" along the top, is just glue enough? I can get the 3/4" tongue and grooved for the center panel. Also what brand of glue is recommeneded. All ideas and infom is appreciated.
 

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I'm assuming these are cabinet doors?

Biscuits really are not any good for cabinet doors. They're great for faceframes, but not the doors themselves. My suggestion would be to get a self-centering doweling jig or a pocket hole jig (Kreg). Either will make a very strong joint for joining the stiles and rails. Whatever the panel of the door will be, it needs to be "floated" in a groove you can cut on your tablesaw...Not a rabbet, a groove. No glue or fasteners, which allows for expansion. So, your rails and stiles will have to be pretty thick to accomodate a 3/4" thick panel, if that's what you're using.

If these are full size doors (the type you walk through), don't even waste your time with biscuits. Solid wood doors are basically always made with mortise and tenon joinery or using very large cope and stick bits on a shaper or big router table. It would be very, very, very difficult to build full size doors without a good table saw and a jointer.

As for glue, teak is oily. Titebond II or III will work fine, but you need to wipe the surfaces you're gluing with acetone or mineral spirits right before you glue. That will take the oil off the surface so it doesn't affect the glue.

www.woodworkingtalk.com is an excellent resource you might consider.
 

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the Musigician
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hey termite guy...look at his right hand side measurement, 85" ain't no cabinets..... 13 doors???? wow! holy .....that's a lotta doors!!! other than that.... yeah, i think you need more tools than you have.

DM
 

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Yup, I didn't see that 85" dimension! I think 5/4 teak is way too thin for a door frame. 8/4 is more like it, but it depends on the hardware you're using.

Building doors is an art.
 

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Custom Cabinet Maker
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KC; You are correct, I was trying to avoid giving him a heart attack LOL LOL:yes::laughing: After all this is our first meeting :whistling2:
We git him on da second one
 

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Discussion Starter #7
As stated I am looking to make "rustic", secure doors with the tools I have. Nothing fancy, just functional. I've seen some very fuctional doors made with 1" and 1" upper, lower and a cross brace on the back. The downside to these doors is they are put together with bolts or screws, and they don't have a 1 1/2" (6/4???) frame for the hardware.

Does any one have any ideas without using mortise and tenon joinery?
 

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the Musigician
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okiedokie.... now we gotcha. there is no one way to make a door, so keep thinking outside the box!
here's a door i made for our wood storage 'box' that might be sort of what you are saying... 3 walnut slabs, 4 oak slats...no M&T, no T&G.... just glue and bolts. 4 years old, no splits or problems. probably not what you want exactly, it's more of a cabinet style. it's just something i made because i needed a custom door there, but the idea may work for you as well.

DM
 

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Don't shy away from mortice and tenon

Over the years I have made several frame and panel doors, mortice and tenon with fewer tools than you have, basically a radial arm saw and a 2HP plunge router. You said you can have the wood cut any way you want it. I had the lumberyard plane 2" rough to 1 and 3/4", put on a straight edge and rip to 5" or 5 and 1/2". You pay a milling charge but don't need large equipment. I used a 1/2" plunge bit to cut the mortices. At first I had a 2" long bit and deepened the hole by chopping it by hand but the mortice drifted a little and threw the door out of plane. I later bought a very long plunge bit, 3" or 3 and 1/2" and the mortices stayed straight. Make the mortices about three inches long so you leave a shoulder for the rail to bear on.
 
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