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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are building up our bathroom wall to install a shower. The plumbing is done and the frame is up. We just completed the install of the concrete boards and drywall. Now we have started the mudding process.

There is a section on the side that bowed in about a 1/2 inch. I filled that with the compound and smoothed it out. now that it's starting to dry there are major cracks starting to form.

Should i remove all that compound and start over with small applications or can i just wait until it completely drys then put another thinner layer over the top?

Any help you can give is much appreciated. :icon_cheesygrin:
 

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There are three or four different types of compound---what type did you use?
 

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Wrong stuff----for filling major areas like that use the bag mix--easy sand 20--45--or 90 minute set.

It shrinks very little and is extremely strong and hard--then top it with a topping compound (light weight-blue lid)

The All purpose that you are using is a setting compound--it contains glue--and is used primarily to set the paper after all cracks and voids have been filled with 20 minute powdered mix.

---Mike---
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@ Mike - so should I try to take it all out and start over with what you suggested or is there a way I can fix it from where I'm at now?

@ Bud - I guess it's really not a wall...just a side piece where the 2x4 frame was.

Sorry for my ignorance guys...I've never done any sort of project before so I'm very naive when it comes to this stuff :)
 

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Has it hardened up completely?---You put that on way to thick---

If it's completely hard then you may have success going over it--I'd remove that area---fix the bad stud--re rock it and have it right.

But that's me--I'm fast with drywall.----Mike---
 

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@ Bud - I guess it's really not a wall...just a side piece where the 2x4 frame was.
Makes no sense! You are on site and can see the overall and are intimate with it. We have only a close up of a cracked wall to see.

Where is that wall in the overall scheme of the project?:)
 

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Drywall mud should not be used in a wet area like the tub/shower walls---there are other water resistant products used in wet areas.---Mike---
 

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Tileguy
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It looks like a knee-wall at a tub surround and that's why I'm asking where this wall is. If it is inside a tub/shower area...all of that fill is worse than regular drywall. Even regular drywall is forbidden in such locations.:)

How about you back up a few feet and take another picture.
We aren't studying micro-organisms here.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok...this first pic is what it looks like in the tub area. We used cement board with the All purpose compound for the joints.

The second pic is on the side and back where we used drywall in conjuction with the all purpose compound.

We originally had just a knee wall since it was just a tub.

What do you think?
 

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Hi,

The cracks are fine, it's from the shrinkage that happened as the water evaporated from the compound. Just keep coating it. For the future, 1/2" is really too deep for normal compound, you need a chemically setting compound as a "prefill" but I wouldn't worry about it now. As far as mudding in the shower, well that was a mistake. You shouldn't be putting any drywall based product under the tile. If it ever gets wet it will soften and turn back into wet mud. It's done now I wouldn't worry too much about it. But you can get a waterproof sealer to apply over the top of the mud before you tile to remedy the problem. Should be available at a tile store.

Dan
 

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Tileguy
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The cracks are fine, it's from the shrinkage that happened as the water evaporated from the compound. Just keep coating it.

I wouldn't worry about it now.

It's done now I wouldn't worry too much about it.

...you can get a waterproof sealer to apply over the top of the mud before you tile to remedy the problem.
I couldn't disagree with all that more. What you have done is not going to work for long. Even coating with a waterproofing product won't be the answer. The waterproofing won't stick to the drywall compound it will just peel off. If you do get tile on the waterproofing, in time the humidity and weight of the tile will cause the tile attached to the waterproofing to de-laminate.

This project is sunk at this point unless all of the drywall compound is removed and re-done with thinset mortar.:)
 

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I couldn't disagree with all that more. What you have done is not going to work for long. Even coating with a waterproofing product won't be the answer. The waterproofing won't stick to the drywall compound it will just peel off. If you do get tile on the waterproofing, in time the humidity and weight of the tile will cause the tile attached to the waterproofing to de-laminate.

This project is sunk at this point unless all of the drywall compound is removed and re-done with thinset mortar.:)
Yes, what you suggest is best, however I disagree with your comments on the waterproofing. If he uses the right product it will have no problem sticking to the mud, on top of this, if everything is sealed properly humidy will not be a problem.

Dan
 

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Well... I suppose that would depend on where you live. Here when I renovated our upstairs shower the 40 year old drywall (and wood) was as dry as it could ever be.

Look, I understand what you are saying and you are right. However they do make that waterproofing product just for this reason. If it really was a problem the high quality builders I work for would never use it. By the way, normally they don't because we know better than to completely tape out behind tile.

Which reminds me actually... you are right, don't get me wrong, but typically in the 1000 units we do per year there is drywall compound at least a foot into the shower behind the tile. Never a problem.

If the guy wants to spend his time wetting and scraping off that mud, then yes your advice is better. However I myself might be inclined to just say screw it, water proof it and tile it. But then again, i would have NEVER of done that to begin with. I also wouldn't have used cement board, I'd have used vinyl faced tile backer.

Dan
 
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