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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I have a "main panel" on the inside wall of my garage with no main circuit breaker connected through the wall to an outside box that houses the main breaker (just through the wall and below the inside box). The inside panel is wired as a main service panel (neutral bar bonded to box and ground bar connected to the neutral bar). Why is this inside panel not considered a sub-panel and wired with the neutral and ground bars separated?
Thanks! Brad
 

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It should be wired as sub panel.
Where does the main ground conductor enter? The main disconnect? or the panel? Normally the ground should enter the main disconnect and a four wire feeder to the panel.
 

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Licensed Electrical Cont.
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That should NOT be wired this way. Even though this is your service panel, there should be NO neutral bond.
 

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Agreed, it is wrong. The "point of service" is that main breaker. That's where your grounding electrode conductors should originate from, and that's where the bonding should occur. Neutrals should definately float in the interior panel, which is a sub-panel, even though it is the only panel you have.
 

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I am seeing many people using combo meter/load center enclosures. In each and every case all subsequent panels connected to this type of service panel will be considered sub panels.
I have become very fond of these type service panels as you can use lug panels inside and out. Plus they have the capability of a few breaker slots in them that can be used for anything you like. Great for pools spas, and detached structures ect....
 
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