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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've decided to replace a small 1 gang box with a much larger one. Removal of the old fiber box means sawing thru the nails with a hacksaw blade. I'm concerned that during removal, damage to the height of the box will be such that adjusting ears of the blue plastic box will no longer hold the box firmly in place. Therefore, I've decide to have a Madison Smart Box as a backup if needed. The big box stores here do not stock them.

Anyone used these boxes and and your opinion good or bad?
 

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They're the best thing since sliced bread for residential, especially if you're next to a stud and no room for an old work box side wings. The captive nails that you can hammer inside the box make it quick and easy to install, no side drilling required. WalMart and Lowe's has them here.

The old work boxes are my least favorite but they serve a purpose that the smart box can't handle.
 
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Those boxes use screws inside the box, not nails.
 

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They're the best thing since sliced bread for residential, especially if you're next to a stud and no room for an old work box side wings. The captive nails that you can hammer inside the box make it quick and easy to install, no side drilling required. WalMart and Lowe's has them here.

The old work boxes are my least favorite but they serve a purpose that the smart box can't handle.
I love smart boxes. Great invention!

Those boxes use screws inside the box, not nails.
Jim I saw some online that actually use nails. I was searching "smart boxes" when I ran across it.
I was surprised as this type of box is asking for a nice hole in the wall when the installer misses the mark.......LOL
 

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I've decided to replace a small 1 gang box with a much larger one. Removal of the old fiber box means sawing thru the nails with a hacksaw blade. I'm concerned that during removal, damage to the height of the box will be such that adjusting ears of the blue plastic box will no longer hold the box firmly in place. Therefore, I've decide to have a Madison Smart Box as a backup if needed. The big box stores here do not stock them.

Anyone used these boxes and and your opinion good or bad?
Best thing since sliced bread. Like Surferdude said above. But you must be up against a stud.
And please, get the ones with screws. Check Arlingtons web site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have removed the old box and I can feel the 2 cables are nailed to the stud within a few inches of the box opening. Can I remove the Smart Box retaining plastic pieces completely ( similar to the blue plastic box retainers) ? Otherwise it's going to be a bear getting those short cables through.
 

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Remove the fasteners from the cables if possible. Look up in there with a flashlight and mirror or phone camera and see what you're dealing with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
with a mirror I can see the staple on each of 2 cables. This is an outside wall and insulation blocks viewing beyond the cables. Without opening up the wall I can't loosen or remove the cables and re-secure the them. So unless there is an exception to requiring the cables to be secured in the box, I'll go forward trying to make it work.
 

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I'm not that particular on remodel work about reattaching cables that were fastened so close to the box that they can't be reused and have legal length in the box. One way or the other, it may not be complying with code for new work if the wires aren't long enough to enter 6" or they aren't secured properly... you choose whuch you like best.

If I can get the staples out, I do it. There's such a thing as being too particular for your own good.:wink2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You have used the Smart Box? What is the best method for breaking open the retainers? These look more formidable than the ones in the blue plastic box.
 

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Break out easy with a screw drive. Be careful because it's a concentric knock out and the 3/4 comes out if your not careful. Arlington comes with "black button" connectors. Carlon makes a similar box that has connectors built it. Kinda like 2 flaps you push the wire into.
 

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I have removed the old box and I can feel the 2 cables are nailed to the stud within a few inches of the box opening. Can I remove the Smart Box retaining plastic pieces completely ( similar to the blue plastic box retainers) ? Otherwise it's going to be a bear getting those short cables through.
Either make the clamps bigger, because they are tough even with the wires loose, or work on removing the staple. Do not try to pry them out with a screwdriver, because you will damage the wire.
 

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So unless there is an exception to requiring the cables to be secured in the box, I'll go forward trying to make it work.
If the new box is a single gang (if you stated this in the thread I did not see it) and the existing staples will end up being within 8" of the installed box you may go ahead and completely remove the clamp ears.
 

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There are push in connectors that install from the inside of the box.
Not for a Madison smart box. The cable connectors are integral.

N E C requires fastening with in 12 in. of box.
No, sir. Not for the exception I was referring to.

314.17 Conductors Entering Boxes, Conduit Bodies, or Fittings.

(C) Nonmetallic Boxes and Conduit Bodies.

Exception: Where nonmetallic-sheathed cable or multiconductor Type UF cable is used with single gang boxes not larger than a nominal size 57 mm × 100 mm (21∕4 in. × 4 in.) mounted in walls or ceilings, and where the cable is fastened within 200 mm (8 in.) of the box measured along the sheath and where the sheath extends through a cable knockout not less than 6 mm (1∕4 in.), securing the cable to the box shall not be required. Multiple cable entries shall be permitted in a single cable knockout opening.
 
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