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Does anyone have experience, guidance, tips on what is required for LV wiring at rough-in inspection?

I have run a number of speaker wires, coax, ethernet (CL2/CL3) but they do not all terminate in a LV Box rather I just have them dangling. This is because some wires will support in-wall speakers, in-ceiling speakers which I want installed in the middle of the studs and I have an idea on the height but will sort this out later at installation. So my thought was to leave them dangling to be covered by the drywall.

Same goes with my COAX subwoofer locations. I have them dangling in the wall and plan is to use a LV old work bracket post-drywall.

Thank you.
 

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Inspection is going to depend on local codes and the inspector.
In my opinion, do not let them just dangle.
Mount new work low voltage rings for the coax and ethernet.
Buy rough in brackets for the speakers and mount them now.
 

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Generally anything less than 50 volts is overlooked, at least in my area. I simply put a nail in a stud and wind the speaker wire around it. It passes inspection and the drywall guy knows to leave a hole with the wire sticking out.
 

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Likewise, low voltage wiring is not included in code requirements here. The only restrictions is not to combine low voltage and higher voltage in the same box without a divider.
 

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Likewise, low voltage wiring is not included in code requirements here. The only restrictions is not to combine low voltage and higher voltage in the same box without a divider.

Not exactly true. "Power Limited" wiring is covered in the national code book and requirements, but in most parts of the country you don't need to be an electrician or have any special training in order to install it. A couple of main points in the code book are that it has to be installed in a "neat and workman like manner" and it can't be run in the same conduit or junction box as 110v wires (or zip tied to the outside of the conduit or romex) . Other than that, for the most part, anything goes.

Use romex staples or figure out another way to attach the wires to the studs every once in a while so that it looks nice, and you should be good.
 

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It is perhaps a great problem that the US does not adhere to the IEC definitions of Voltage Levels.

Simply stated, the IEC definitions are
High Voltage = > 1000 V AC or > 1500 V DC
Low Voltage = 50 to 1000 V AC or 20 to 1500 DC
Extra Low Voltage = < 50 V AC or < 120 DC

You should be able to connect any and all devices operating in the IEC Extra Low Voltage (ELV) range in any neat, safe, workmanlike manner and your "local code", whatever that is, should support you.
 

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Does the electrical code - any jurisdiction - address wiring and circuits that are not directly connected to the grid? If it did, how would phone, cable, sound, computer, etc. installers legally operate.
 

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Does the electrical code - any jurisdiction - address wiring and circuits that are not directly connected to the grid? If it did, how would phone, cable, sound, computer, etc. installers legally operate.

Yes. All of that stuff is covered under the power limited section of the NEC. Some of the stuff is actually pretty important, such as proper grounding for things such as satellite dishes and service entrances for phone, data, and cable wiring.

I am in Minnesota, and here you are supposed to be a licensed electrician or have a special "power limited" license in order to install any of that stuff. Permits are supposed to be pulled and inspections are supposed to happen. This has been a requirement for about 15 years or so, although it seems to be rarely enforced.

From my understanding, Minnesota is the only state that is like this. In all other states, there are no licensing requirements to install wiring for data, audio, cable tv, etc., and no inspections are required.
 

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Yes. All of that stuff is covered under the power limited section of the NEC. Some of the stuff is actually pretty important, such as proper grounding for things such as satellite dishes and service entrances for phone, data, and cable wiring.

I am in Minnesota, and here you are supposed to be a licensed electrician or have a special "power limited" license in order to install any of that stuff. Permits are supposed to be pulled and inspections are supposed to happen. This has been a requirement for about 15 years or so, although it seems to be rarely enforced.

From my understanding, Minnesota is the only state that is like this. In all other states, there are no licensing requirements to install wiring for data, audio, cable tv, etc., and no inspections are required.

That's interesting. It makes sense (to me anyway) for low voltage circuits that are tied to the grid; i.e. a door bell powered by a transformer, but not for signal or data lines, particularly if they originate from an approved device, such as speaker wire connected to an amp. I am not aware of any licencing of data/comm installers here. Learn something new everyday. Tnx.
 

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I'd echo the advice above, get the rough in brackets for the speakers, and put up some boxes for the coax/ethernet cables. You can always add a longer patch cable after the drywall is up, makes for a neater installation, and makes it less likely the drywaller will lose your cables in the wall.
In New Jersey, and starting more in New York, all LV cabling is subject to rough inspections, and in my experience it's better to put in a couple of new work plastic boxes, staple the cable with romex staples (or other approved hangers/strapping) and keep the inspector happy and not hold up the other trades.
 
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