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Having issues finding a good paint. Also want to share what has succeeded and failed in my experience to help my fellow homeowners. Any extra input before I move onto my second phase of painting would help.

Bought a home with a builder. The walls were given a knock-down texture. But they laid it on really thick. (It was done overnight, so you can imagine how all my walls look like they have warts.) Did not want it, but the builder didn't budge.

The home is open with many tall windows and a windowless hall, so light and dark areas abound. Removing the texture and making it orange peel or Level 4 or 5 smooth was too expensive since ceilings on this single-story are 11 ft–12 ft. Decided to make the best of it.

Finding a paint, paint viscosity, and the paint color resulted in a lot of money spent. (Reds and yellows in the paint tints were amplified on the walls and the expensive offerings in flat from SW and PPG [Emerald and Manor Hall, respectively] were too runny and ineffective.) FYI: Went to PPG,
Benjamin Moore (BM), Home Depot (HD), Lowe's (L), and Sherwin Williams (SW) in town.

Flat will only work with this texture. Anything with a sheen (Satin, Eggshell, etc.) looks gaudy.

Should have just asked a contractor to do change the texture because this "investment" left me fatigued, distraught, spent (money-wise), and put me off in so many ways. This is why I waited on painting the rest of the house for a full year.

Used SW's Cashmere (flat) and BM's Regal (flat) in the end. Still need to find a paint viscosity equivalent at PPG but flat. Any help or recommendations with PPG will help. All I have found is Silken Touch, but that has a sheen, which experience shows is awful to the eye.

Read below (in blue; 3rd to last paragraph) to see why I am going with PPG for the next phase and not SW and BM.


For the whole ordeal, here is what happened:

Fell in love with a paint that was discontinued: KWAL's Designer White
905-062. It was in the model home and worked perfectly with the texture.

When we got to the paint stage, the builder forgot to mention that KWAL's Designer White was discontinued. (After research after closing, I found that SW bought out KWAL and absorbed their business [aka, killed it].) So their "remedy" was to use SW's Pure White, which they swore would resemble Designer White. No need to tell you that many fits and fights resulted from this lie. (And our realtor was no help. And it didn't help that our realtor was starting to take other clients to this builder's other communities and making a boatload of money either.)

So I went to a SW, hoping they would have it in there system. No dice. They could match most all other KWAL colors in their system, but it turns out Designer White was produced at KWAL factories only in 5 gallons. So there is no way they could reproduce it. (
And the model home no longer had the paint gallon available since they painted the home 5 years prior, when KWAL was still in business.) But the manager said if I cold get a sample, he'd match it.

Further research led me to PPG, who had partnered or owns KWAL outside the U.S. So I called one local branch and asked if they could make it. Again, no dice.

I called SW office that was the former KWAL HQ in Colorado, but that's where I learned it was produced onsite in 5-gallon tubs. But they didn't make it anymore.

So now I had to find a color and a texture in FLAT, no less, to cover the ungodly sight that is knockdown.

Went to HD and L. All their whites became gaudily accentuated because of the texture and the light. Any red or yellow in the paints would be magnified.

Went to PPG. Tried their Manor Hall. While nice, the scrubbing feature makes it too runny. This is the same with SW's Emerald. It's like painting with watercolors.

Well, after 4 months we found the right color for the main part of the home at SW. And we found another color at BM for a study. PPG also had the colors we wanted for the bedrooms (their grays actually looked gray—not blue, purple, or brown as SW and BM's colors looked).

By this point, we befriended the SW manager, who took pity on us after all the samples and different colors and textures. He then recommended Cashmere. It's thick (like a thin rubber), comes in flat (hallelujah), and while not washable (that's fine with us after months of searching—we don't care anymore), would reduce the prominence of the pockmarks (err, knock-down texture).

Benjamin Moore also had a good texture in flat: Regal. They said Aura is better and is the equivalent to SW Cashmere, but I wasn't about to pay $70 a gallon.

Lessons learned from this ordeal:
• SW, BM, and PPG have different paints tints. No one can match the others' paints exactly because of this. If that doesn't matter, then feel free to use your preferred company.
• Cashmere and Regal (and possibly Aura) cover up the mess that is knock-down texture.
• Manor Hall and Emerald are good for washing messes if you have kids. But they are runny and won't cover the visual mess of knock-down texture.
• Go one shade higher. If you think you found the right shade, also get the lighter version from the color palette in a sample. Odds are the one you like will look darker on knock-down texture.
• If your home has a lot of light and shadow WITH knock-down and you want an elegant look, avoid colors that rely on red and yellow tints. Needless to say, blues, greens, purples, etc. are out. The less color the better. But it's your house, so do what makes you (or rather the Mrs.) happy.

p.s.: Was able to get SW to match KWAL's Designer White from a sample. (I won't say how I got the sample.) Will post the formula for you in the future.
 

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Knockdown is rarely used in Residential around here.
For good reason.
Wait until you need to do any sort of wall repair or a patch.
 

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Having issues finding a good paint. Also want to share what has succeeded and failed in my experience to help my fellow homeowners. Any extra input before I move onto my second phase of painting would help.

Bought a home with a builder. The walls were given a knock-down texture. But they laid it on really thick. (It was done overnight, so you can imagine how all my walls look like they have warts.) Did not want it, but the builder didn't budge.

The home is open with many tall windows and a windowless hall, so light and dark areas abound. Removing the texture and making it orange peel or Level 4 or 5 smooth was too expensive since ceilings on this single-story are 11 ft–12 ft. Decided to make the best of it.

Finding a paint, paint viscosity, and the paint color resulted in a lot of money spent. (Reds and yellows in the paint tints were amplified on the walls and the expensive offerings in flat from SW and PPG [Emerald and Manor Hall, respectively] were too runny and ineffective.) FYI: Went to PPG,
Benjamin Moore (BM), Home Depot (HD), Lowe's (L), and Sherwin Williams (SW) in town.

Flat will only work with this texture. Anything with a sheen (Satin, Eggshell, etc.) looks gaudy.

Should have just asked a contractor to do change the texture because this "investment" left me fatigued, distraught, spent (money-wise), and put me off in so many ways. This is why I waited on painting the rest of the house for a full year.

Used SW's Cashmere (flat) and BM's Regal (flat) in the end. Still need to find a paint viscosity equivalent at PPG but flat. Any help or recommendations with PPG will help. All I have found is Silken Touch, but that has a sheen, which experience shows is awful to the eye.

Read below (in blue; 3rd to last paragraph) to see why I am going with PPG for the next phase and not SW and BM.


For the whole ordeal, here is what happened:

Fell in love with a paint that was discontinued: KWAL's Designer White
905-062. It was in the model home and worked perfectly with the texture.

When we got to the paint stage, the builder forgot to mention that KWAL's Designer White was discontinued. (After research after closing, I found that SW bought out KWAL and absorbed their business [aka, killed it].) So their "remedy" was to use SW's Pure White, which they swore would resemble Designer White. No need to tell you that many fits and fights resulted from this lie. (And our realtor was no help. And it didn't help that our realtor was starting to take other clients to this builder's other communities and making a boatload of money either.)

So I went to a SW, hoping they would have it in there system. No dice. They could match most all other KWAL colors in their system, but it turns out Designer White was produced at KWAL factories only in 5 gallons. So there is no way they could reproduce it. (
And the model home no longer had the paint gallon available since they painted the home 5 years prior, when KWAL was still in business.) But the manager said if I cold get a sample, he'd match it.

Further research led me to PPG, who had partnered or owns KWAL outside the U.S. So I called one local branch and asked if they could make it. Again, no dice.

I called SW office that was the former KWAL HQ in Colorado, but that's where I learned it was produced onsite in 5-gallon tubs. But they didn't make it anymore.

So now I had to find a color and a texture in FLAT, no less, to cover the ungodly sight that is knockdown.

Went to HD and L. All their whites became gaudily accentuated because of the texture and the light. Any red or yellow in the paints would be magnified.

Went to PPG. Tried their Manor Hall. While nice, the scrubbing feature makes it too runny. This is the same with SW's Emerald. It's like painting with watercolors.

Well, after 4 months we found the right color for the main part of the home at SW. And we found another color at BM for a study. PPG also had the colors we wanted for the bedrooms (their grays actually looked gray—not blue, purple, or brown as SW and BM's colors looked).

By this point, we befriended the SW manager, who took pity on us after all the samples and different colors and textures. He then recommended Cashmere. It's thick (like a thin rubber), comes in flat (hallelujah), and while not washable (that's fine with us after months of searching—we don't care anymore), would reduce the prominence of the pockmarks (err, knock-down texture).

Benjamin Moore also had a good texture in flat: Regal. They said Aura is better and is the equivalent to SW Cashmere, but I wasn't about to pay $70 a gallon.

Lessons learned from this ordeal:
• SW, BM, and PPG have different paints tints. No one can match the others' paints exactly because of this. If that doesn't matter, then feel free to use your preferred company.
• Cashmere and Regal (and possibly Aura) cover up the mess that is knock-down texture.
• Manor Hall and Emerald are good for washing messes if you have kids. But they are runny and won't cover the visual mess of knock-down texture.
• Go one shade higher. If you think you found the right shade, also get the lighter version from the color palette in a sample. Odds are the one you like will look darker on knock-down texture.
• If your home has a lot of light and shadow WITH knock-down and you want an elegant look, avoid colors that rely on red and yellow tints. Needless to say, blues, greens, purples, etc. are out. The less color the better. But it's your house, so do what makes you (or rather the Mrs.) happy.

p.s.: Was able to get SW to match KWAL's Designer White from a sample. (I won't say how I got the sample.) Will post the formula for you in the future.


Thanks for sharing your experience.

I would comment on your impressions of how different paint companies can or cannot match each other's colors.

It's true that colorant systems are different, and in some cases one system may not be able to match a particular color %100. But for the most part the major manufactures can reproduce each other's formulas accurately by consulting their data base. It generally isn't a problem to call in to PPG with a BM or SW color name for example. Or trice versa. Even the box stores can do that provided the clerk on duty knows how to do the job.

Never heard of KWAL, and the paint stores maybe haven't either. Even if they have, without a formula posted online, there is no way to match it without a sample.

BTW, Aura is worth the price if you really want the best.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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From Fla the land of texture and most of them are knock down and probably 80 to 85% of them are painted with a sheen from the McMansions to blow and go's you must have gotten about the worst texture job ever. And yes paint companies can match each others colors.
 
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