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Hi all. As I documented in a previous post, I attempted to use self leveler to level a very jacked up basement floor and kind of botched the job. Specifically, I attempted to cover a large area in one go which resulted in having to do many separate pours. So at the end of the day, the floor looks better but is still super bumpy and imperfect. What I SHOULD have done was do several smaller pours in areas sectioned off with weather stripping.

So, I'm going to pour another layer taking this approach. Last time I used LevelQuik RS which, while well-reviewed, is WAY too fast-setting for me as one-person DIY operation. It provides only about 60 seconds of real fluidity. So, this time, I'd like to use a much slower-setting self-leveling compound that would hopefully be more forgiving of a product. Anyone have anything specific they would recommend? Any other suggestions are welcomed. Thanks in advance.
 

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You would think somebody would come up with a slow setting SLC.



One thing that helps is to mix some ice cubes or crushed in in your mix water. Slows down the curing, but not enough. ( Of course, make sure ice is fully melted before mixing)
 

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Years ago when we supplied concrete for a large mass pour of 300/400 hundred yards in a footing , the mix design would sometime call for ice , and it went directly into the mix at the plant , wait for it to melt and your defeating the purpose , carbon dioxide is used now.
 

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As per my USG book you should look at the USG floor leveling products like USG Level Rock & USG Durock Brand these are Gypsum products so make sure you check the data sheet for where they can be used.
 

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Re: "What I SHOULD have done was do several smaller pours in areas sectioned off with weather stripping", -that solves the set-time problem, but then there's no way to be precise enough in the second and successive pours so that everything ends up at the same height. You end up with a terrace effect.
 
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