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Any recommendations?

suit case style is best for my application
 

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AFAIK safes are rated for time that they keep internal temperature X against external temp Y. So it depends how long you expect the house fire to last.
 

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I bought our safe 20+ yrs ago. It said on the box that it was fire proof but the paperwork that came with it stated once the fire truck got there to instruct them to keep pouring water on the section of the house where the safe was - otherwise they wouldn't stand behind their warranty. I've not had a fire [knock on wood] so I really don't know how good it is.
 

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Is paper all you are putting in it ? If so, you can use a class 350 safe.
If you are storing media there are class 150 and 125 safes.

These numbers are the internal temperature that the safe must hold for x time at x fire temperature. So a class 125 2 hour safe is better Protection than a class 350 2 hour safe.

Buy the best protection you can afford if you are looking at a worst case scenario. There were a lot of people in our wildfires where the home burned to the foundations. Many were surprised when they opened there 1/2 hour or 1 hour safes (class 350) and found the papers gone. Between temperature and duration of the fire, the lower levels of protection simply did not withstand it.

If you really want to protect certain documents, I’d look at a safe deposit box at a local bank.
 

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Keep it in the basement.
But off the floor, unless it is also waterproof in addition to fire proof.

You wouldn't believe the amount of water they can pump into even a simple single story house that is fully engulfed.

My neighbors house, a duplex like mine, 1400 sq ft each side, had between 15-20K gallons of water pumped them while fighting a fire that engulfed both sides.
 

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I bought our safe 20+ yrs ago. It said on the box that it was fire proof but the paperwork that came with it stated once the fire truck got there to instruct them to keep pouring water on the section of the house where the safe was - otherwise they wouldn't stand behind their warranty. I've not had a fire [knock on wood] so I really don't know how good it is.
That sounds about right for a manufacturer.



Here Sir, read these instructions and fight the fire accordingly. :vs_laugh:
 

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But off the floor, unless it is also waterproof in addition to fire proof.

You wouldn't believe the amount of water they can pump into even a simple single story house that is fully engulfed.

My neighbors house, a duplex like mine, 1400 sq ft each side, had between 15-20K gallons of water pumped them while fighting a fire that engulfed both sides.
Ours says water proof, for whatever that's worth, but I'm bettin wet would be a step, maybe two, above burned to ashes.:smile:
 

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Most fire resistive safes will be listed at 350 degrees for 1, 2 or 4 hours. Longer time means higher cost. The 125 degree rating is for protecting magnetic media (computer disks, tapes, etc) and humidity must also be controlled. Again, it will cost more.

My recommendation is to insist on a unit with a UL label. That's the only reliable "yardstick" for comparison.
 
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