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This was some time ago, in nj. I changed 3' opening into open hallway. Can't remember exact numbers but I think the finished opening was 9-10'. Specified double 2x10 lvl in the permit drawings and passed without engineer's specs. It was 2003? and I think the town inspectors were familiar enough with lvl and corresponding spans by that time. LVL use was treated like regular lumber.
As such, and your town may be different, I feel comfortable recommending double 2x10 lvl beam (or a header) for up to 9 stud bays. Assuming each bay is 16" oc for that wall. That looks like most of that wall. Posts and what's going to support those posts will depend on what's under the wall. another beam, foundation, probably a new footing?

If you buy from a lumberyard, engineering service, free, may be still available. That is, the lvl company, with your drawings, will spec the lvl for you.
This also depends on what you can live with. Right side of the photo has another beam sitting on the edge of the wall. I assume there's a beam or something underneath supporting the wall post. If you want no post at all, all of it will have to change into a single beam which may be beefier lvl, bigger posts and footings or metal i beam.
Footing, also needs to be spec'ed, but 24x24x12" is generalized size and should handle about all residential loads. As such, if you have a beam under that wall, it may need to be reinforced with additional footings and posts, and this is definitely a job for an engineer. Engineer's cost could be big in ny.
 

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Don't want to keep busting your chops about this framing, and pictures with shadows are very deceiving.
But the beam they are referring to, is it one-ply, sistered or what, and is that airspace above it? Also, behind that one, is that another 2x, sistered or something, breaking up the floor joist span as well (it doesn't look like blocking)?

Window headers all 2x6 throughout?
 

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What happened here? Original build used 2x6 or 2x8 and floor was too bouncy, so they sistered 2x8 or 2x10 in?
Can't figure that one out either, the larger (2x10?) is what is sitting on the top plate, so they later sistered a smaller (2x8?) next to it? I see blocks on this inner wall for the smaller sister, but can't see if there are blocks to rest on top plate on the outer walls.
 

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You need an engineer to evaluate the system, and tell you what you need to change and what you need to add.
 

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At this point, I agree you need a structural engineer who can specify what works and what doesn't, according to recent standards and maybe against what's time proven. "Time proven" is by eye only and often, not much to do with numbers driven rules. But best reference if you want to be certain. BUT,:smile: if you ask an engineer, could start endless corrections.:smile: Maybe some of it was added later? Maybe a wall was removed? Stairwell looks ok even if not much detail. Did you demo the 2nd floor? Any hints there? What's under the photo floor, basement? What beams and walls underneath? So far, not enough info to consider the whole picture.


In your earlier post, somebody told you about the header? Why not ask for a come back visit? You don't have to start with most knowledgeable person. But the house framing looks little unusual so eye witness is important. Hard to tell from few photos.



Also not sure which came first. 2x10 or 2x8? Either could have been added to stiffen up the floor, although 2x10 looks cleaner.


Can't say much about the engineering part of the framing, but, again, based on photos, the framing itself looks ok. They don't look hacked.
 

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if you ask an engineer, could start endless corrections. . . .

. . . . the framing itself looks ok. They don't look hacked.
I would disagree. Every commenter cannot figure out what has been done in any of these threads, and that's telling of a hack job.

Most people say to themselves, "its been standing this long and hasn't fallen down, so why bother changing it (just because some snotty engineer I had to pay for told me its not right)." Wood is very forgiving, and a few nails, even halfway pulled out, will still hold something together, but is knowing that enough to let you sleep peacefully at night?

Maybe some situations don't need to follow best and currently known practices (you could say 'codes'). But in this case, this is their forever home. None of this is Mr Lucky's fault, though they are putting hundreds of thousands into this house. Why sweat all that money, effort, and time putting in new windows, HVAC, everything, and then 2 years later have to figure out why your new ceiling has structural cracks? Your new window won't slide shut because its sagging?

It is completely gutted so you can see things and access everywhere. My viewpoint is while you have a chance, do it right.
 

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OP is already doing well for asking questions. I want him to walk away from all of this with alerted mind with some relevant facts. We've all been through that rabbit hole of rules, conditions and absolute demands. He'd better be alerted:smile: but with a frame of mind that says he has a fairly good house, not something that was built by a hack, which can make him vulnerable to above rules and such.


Another thing to consider is that it is one of the same houses in a developement. The carpenters, by the time they were putting that house together, probably could build it in their sleep. That is not a bad thing, even sleeping.:smile:
 

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We've all been through that rabbit hole of rules, conditions and absolute demands.
Codes exist for a reason, with human nature you have to force some of them to be safe so you and your own wallet are also then safe. Besides, no one person can know everything about everything, so codes are a collection of experts who have been there, studied, tested, and then lay it out for you. Of course red tape exists in anything that is designed to account for any general situation. Whether or not you agree with paying permits, dealing with a-hole inspectors, or not putting (5) 16d nails thru the rafter into the ceiling joist, have nothing to do with calling attention to what could be problematic things.

he has a fairly good house, not something that was built by a hack

Another thing to consider is that it is one of the same houses in a developement. The carpenters, by the time they were putting that house together, probably could build it in their sleep.
This is an old ranch where a second story was added. All the issues that are questionable revolve around adding that second story. If you've seen any of the OP's many different threads that have pics, you would be questioning things too. It was also a foreclosure, and I can tell you from my experience nothing seen here is surprising.

Hopefully for the OP, even though it is hard to accept and may cost more money and time, he is thinking about the issues that have been brought up. If you just want to give a positive spin to prop up the OP's mental state, I just say the OP has what he has, deal with it and make decisions on what commenters have pointed out.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks every. yes this was a second story added by the carpenter who was the homeowner . again we have all the CO's inspections they received after the 2nd floor addition was added. with all that was wrong as you guys say I don't know how they approved it. I'll be getting an engineer.
 
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