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Hi,

We've just bought a house, and there's a wall that's in the way of my dream size wardrobe :furious:

Links to the pics : http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

The logic says 'there's nothing on it!!' But can somebody please reassure me?!

IMG_8924 shows the whole situation the best - or so I think..

The wall was built on a wooden plank on the floor and is no way connected to the downstairs walls..

Thank you,
 

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SharperCleaning said:
A load bearing wall gives a building structural integrity. It carries and distributes weight from the roof and top floors down to the foundation. Know that the outside walls of your home are always considered to be load bearing because these walls support the roof. Additional support has to be given to these walls when any modifications are performed. Locate interior walls of your home that run perpendicular to the rafters. These are load bearing walls.
Perpendicular walls are not always load bearing. If you have engineered trusses in the attic above them, chances are it's not load bearing BUT it's not that easy, you have to see if the truss is rigidly attached to that wall.
 

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Another reason a wall may not be a load bearing is if the room is narrower in width than it is long. Example, a room say 14X20 feet you wouldn't use 20 foot ceiling joist just to tie the outside walls together, that could be done in different ways.
 

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The wall was built on a wooden plank on the floor and is no way connected to the downstairs walls..
If the wall was built on a floor that is not directly supported below then it is not a load bearing wall. (if it was built properly to begin with) If the wall is a load bearing wall then the "load" would carry straight down to the foundations or footers. Or there would be a beam the wall is built on.
 
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