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Discussion Starter #1
look at the pictures and tell me if its load bearing.

Picture 1 - attic, to the left is a load bearing wall because I see the joists intersect one another. But the question I have is to the right where you see the roof supports. They run at an angle right down to a wall. Which is picture number 2


Picture 2 - wall. Not sure if its load bearing
 

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"You can do anything"-Mom
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Move some of that insulation. Are those braces secured to the bottom chord (rafter) or to the wall. The only way they would provide structural support would be if they are attached to the rafter. I dont know how a wall oriented perpendicular to line of action would add any structural support to those diagonal braces.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
brockmiera said:
Move some of that insulation. Are those braces secured to the bottom chord (rafter) or to the wall. The only way they would provide structural support would be if they are attached to the rafter. I dont know how a wall oriented perpendicular to line of action would add any structural support to those diagonal braces.
Here's some pictures. You can see the wall plate
 

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journeyman carpenter
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its not a trussed roof, its stick framed.. and im with kwik.. i dont like how the ceiling is framed.. its not strapped which not only gives lateral support to the roof but it also provides a better nailing surface for the drywall especially in corners so the board doesnt flex when its being taped
 

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Discussion Starter #6
woodworkbykirk said:
its not a trussed roof, its stick framed.. and im with kwik.. i dont like how the ceiling is framed.. its not strapped which not only gives lateral support to the roof but it also provides a better nailing surface for the drywall especially in corners so the board doesnt flex when its being taped
I guess what im asking is...Can I remove the wall?
 

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Those are purlins, and as others have stated, they are there to reduce the effective span of the rafters. Without the purlins, your rafters would likely be undersized and you would see a considerable sag in your roof.

The purlins do transfer loads from your roof through the wall, especially during wind and snow loadings. I'll point out that most purlins in my area aren't nailed to the side of the joist like that. They are typically nailed to the top plate.

Can you remove the wall? Maybe. If you do, your ceiling joists will experience point loads, and point loads aren't allowed unless you have an engineer who does calculations to show that it is OK. If you decide to remove the wall, you'll likely have to change how the purlins connect to the ceiling joists and you should be prepared for a sagging ceiling and popped dry wall screws.
 

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Whqt size are your ceiling joists? How far do they span? what size are your rafters? Where are you located?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
well looks like i have my answer....



Purlin Systems

You can also see the purlin system.

Purlin systems are designed to reduce the distance that rafters have to span. They consist of strongbacks nailed to the undersides of the rafters and supported by diagonal braces.


The bottoms of purlin braces should rest on top of a bearing wall. Braces that rest on ceiling joists or which somehow pass the roof load to the ceiling below are defective installations. If you see braces which rest on ceiling joists, look for a sag in the ceiling.
 

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