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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!

So, I recently rented an apartment in NY - saw the place, loved the old wood floors, signed the lease. Then I get a call from the broker not one week later and he's in a panic. The landlord has replaced the living room wood floor with 24x24 White Carrara Marble tiles.

We have several reasons for not wanting to have marble tile in the living room including potential damage due by heavy equipment (my husband's profession requires a lot of heavy things to be rolled through the area) and simply not wanting to live in a Grecian palace.

We are discussing alternatives. Either spend $1000+ on area rugs to cover it up, or spend $500 on the cheap Home Depot Traffic Master fake wood linoleum. The linoleum would most easily acheive the protection, easy maintenance and general look that we are looking for, but my concern is that it might be difficult to remove when it comes time for us to move out.

Does anyone have any thoughts on how to handle this situation? Or had the experience of removing TrafficMaster linoleum for marble tile? Would this be a difficult process?
 

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Once you put those self-stick tiles down, the adhesive is going to be a murderous mess later on after heat, pressure and time, you'd be super lucky if they scrape up and don't leave pieces of the tile behind, or adhesive residue, this stuff is not meant to be laid down temporarily and be removed when you move out!
At the very least you would have to use a heat gun to soften the adhesive up and it's all but guaranteed you would have a mess afterwards that would be a real pain to remove from the marble.
Marble also stains easily, what will you do if somehow the linoleum's adhesive discolors or stains the marble somehow? You would be on the hook for replacing that marble.
Only other option is lay down sheets of plywood or masonite or underlayment and stick thelinoleum on that, but covering the whole floor with that would cost more than the carpet.

Do you really think there is anyone here or anywhere else who would actually have stuck cheap linoleum tiles over expensive NEW marble tile and then removed it?? It works the other way around, the cheap linoleum gets covered over by expensive marble tile.

Better to get the cheapest carpet.
 

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Traffic master does not get glued down to the floor.
Natural stone tile is brittle, who knows if the landlord bothered to even check if this floor would even support tile. By far a larger tile is far more likely to crack then a smaller tile.
He goes rolling around something heavy over that floor and you may end up with a real mess.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It is ironic, isn't it, to be covering up such an expensive finish? We picked this place because the wood floors were older and wouldn't mind another scuff or 10 from the equipment. The landlord went ahead and upgraded without asking, but it's like handing a Porsche to a 16-year-old who just got his license. Thanks for this really expensive nice thing, but you know I'm going to mess it up! I was not there for the tile installation so I can't tell what the substrate situation is. The landlord says it's concrete underneath, which would help with stability, but at such a large sized tile and not knowing if they bothered with the waterproofing underlayment, I'm pretty sure it'll still crack...

To clarify what I'm looking for, I need a temporary flooring solution that will 1) protect the marble underneath, 2) be able to stand up to the heavy equipment rolling over it and 3) be easy to clean.

I'm not too familiar with residential flooring materials, and have been looking around online. Is TrafficMaster essentially a floating laminate floor? Is there some kind of cushion-y underlayment we can put underneath such a floor to give the marble extra protection?
 

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Does the landlord know about your plans for moving this heavy stuff around on his new floor?
As a landlord I know I would not allow it and would evict you if I knew it was going on. That's way beyond normal wear and tear.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Indeed, he does know. We were very upfront about what our requirements were because it is so unusual.

He said that the marble floor would be stronger and easier to maintain than the original wood floor. I'm very doubtful...
 

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Me to, marble is porous and very brittle. The type and size were very poor choices on his part.
 
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