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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
hello every one. i have a electrical question. '

ive done my own electrical for years. however, this is a first.


question

i have a pond with a small bldg aprox 950 ft from my main house that id like to run power to. what id be looking providing power for is

3 lights max 60 watts ea

1 aerator with the following specs
SafeStart™ Compressor Technology
• UL, 115 volt, single phase, max 35 PSI
• Thermal overload protection
• 1/2 hp (0.37 kW) for exceptionally low monthly electrical costs
• 4.2 amps and 4.2 CFM at typical 10.0 PSI operating pressure

main house has a 200 amp panel. was planning to run a 10/3 direct bury
to provide 2 15 amp circuits 1 for lights & the other just for the aerator.

would the 10 gauge wire provide enough capacity to meet this load demand. I know there will be voltage drop but im just not understanding the numbers involved to determine whether or not this will work. i hate to spend the money on a roll of 10/3 & then find out it not work. spoke with electric co. & they would prefer i run a whole new service to pond. but heck then i have to pay for new service not to mention all the monthly taxes & service fees involved..\

if this is doable what size breakers would be used at both ends

any suggestions would be deeply apreciated
thanks jshepp
 

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If you want to use # 10 you will have to get a 240 volt compressor and use 240 volt light bulbs.If you did this you would not need a neutral. The compressor alone at 120 according to a online calculator would require #6.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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I'd run a 240 Volt circuit with 10/2 and use a transformer at the far end to create 120/240 nominal voltage for your loads. Get a multi-tap transformer/power conditioner so you can bump it up to achieve your desired output.
 

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Semi-Pro Electro-Geek
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You might even want to consider a small solar power system instead of running that much wire. That is an exceedingly long run. If you can use an aerator that only operates sometimes, or a lower-power aerator, then a solar setup might be more affordable.
 

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They also make windmills that have an air pump, but the ones I have seen are quite expensive. It might be a good option if you could fined one for cheap and you have a fair amount of wind where you live. I agree that the transformer would probably be best if you run power out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ok guys i did some research on multitap tramsformer & will call acme on monday. but thier website also suggested a buck/ boost transfromer.

based upon what im trying to do, this would boost me up to 25%. that should be suffiecient. or am i interpreting this correctly. not sure of the difference between multitap & buck/ boost other than multitap appears to be more directed to landscaping

it appears a buck boost rated at 15A goes for about $100

not sure about the cost for the multitap

any input or either will be appreciated

thanks john
 

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" Euro " electrician
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That is pretty long run some case what I do is run two transfomers (480X120/240 volts } so you can get by with #10 AWG that will keep the cost down a little otherwise you will have to find #6 URD alum cables.

I know # 6 is about the smallest URD alum cable they do make { unless I am wrong on that one }

Merci,
Marc
 

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ok guys i did some research on multitap tramsformer & will call acme on monday. but thier website also suggested a buck/ boost transfromer.

based upon what im trying to do, this would boost me up to 25%. that should be suffiecient. or am i interpreting this correctly. not sure of the difference between multitap & buck/ boost other than multitap appears to be more directed to landscaping

it appears a buck boost rated at 15A goes for about $100

not sure about the cost for the multitap

any input or either will be appreciated

thanks john
You don't want to use a buck/boost transformer for this. That is used to make relatively small adjustments in voltage (say, changing 208V to 240V) or to compensate for consistent voltage drop on a circuit with a constant load. Instead, you want to run 240V power and use a transformer to convert it to 120V at the far end. Even better, as Frenchelectrician said, you can use a transformer at each end: one to step 240V up to 480, then one to convert 480V to 120/240. This will allow the smallest wire possible.
 
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