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Mad Scientist
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A picture would be worth a thousand words here, as I'm having trouble visualizing what you're looking at.

Exactly how many wires of each color are in the box? How are they grouped as far as which conduit they come out of? How where they connected to the original switch? Was this a lighted switch, or a switch and separate pilot light in the same box?
 

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Mad Scientist
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Ok. Do you have a multimeter or voltage detector? One of the black wires should be the power from the breaker box, and the other two are power out. One should be for whatever the switch used to control, and the other should be power for the rest of the circuit that's not working anymore.

Was the "loose" black wire from the second pipe capped with a wire nut or something, or just a bare wire loose in the box? Did the old switch have holes in the back to insert wires into along with the screw terminals on the side? Is it possible that wire was originally inserted in a hole on the back of the switch, and popped out when you removed the switch?

I think I know how this should be fixed, but I want to be sure of the situation first.
 

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Mad Scientist
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This is how it (probably) should be: The constant hot black wire in the first pipe should be joined with a wirenut to the black wire from the second pipe, and also to a short length of wire connected to one of the terminals on the switch.

The other black wire in the first pipe should be connected to the other terminal on the switch.

You're going to need some way to check for voltage to figure out which wire is the constant hot.
 

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Mad Scientist
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You're on the right track, I'm thinking that power for the other bedroom is fed through this switch box. I don't like to use those push-in holes, because they tend to fail over time, which is why I suggest using a wirenut. You still need to figure out which wire is which in order to wire this back up, though.
 

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Mad Scientist
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Well, I can't really endorse that as a testing method :eek:, but that makes this much easier now.

First, TURN OFF THE POWER.

Then, connect the constant hot to one of the other black wires with a wirenut. Turn the power on, and see if the light is on, or if the rest of the circuit is working now.

Whichever wire brings power to the rest of the circuit needs to be wirenutted to the constant hot, and also to a short length of wire connected to a screw on the switch. The other black wire should be for the light, and should be connected to the other screw on the switch.
 

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Mad Scientist
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If you can tell which of the wires was on the top screw of the old switch, then that wire should probably be joined to the constant hot.

If you get the wires mixed up, the worst that should happen is you'll find that the light is always on, and the switch controls the power to the rest of the circuit.

Assuming you're flipping the correct breaker, there should be no power at all in that box with the breaker off. I'm repeating myself, but you should really invest in at least a non-contact voltage detector, to be sure that things are dead before poking around in them.
 

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Mad Scientist
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I'm not entirely certain how you have this wired. Let me try to clarify:

You should have the constant hot connected with a wirenut to one of the two black wires in the first pipe, and also to a six-inch length of wire connected to one of the screws on the switch. The other black wire in the first pipe should be connected to the other screw on the switch.

I can't recommend using the push-in holes on the back of the switch. They make a very weak connection and have a habit of falling out or burning up, especially if there are outlets on this circuit that a vacuum or something might get plugged into.
 
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