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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a new construction installation using a 3 way circuit with Aquity brand JUNO recessed LED can lights. I have the circuit powered with a run of 12-2 and the 3 way is 12-3.

I have checked and rechecked the circuit and the wiring is correct. I have removed the 3 way switches and used a single pole switch and the lights turn off correctly (no glow).

I am using new Lutron 3 way basic switches (non-illuminated, non-dimmer).

I have read on some forums that a resistor can eliminate this issue but I need help sizing the appropriate resistor.

Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Naildriver
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Replace one of the bulbs with an incandescent bulb and see what happens. You shouldn't need a resister with non dimmable switches, but we'll see.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No, it's not from phantom voltage. If I eliminate the 3 way portion of the circuit and wire in one single pole switch the lights go completely out.

It seems to be voltage leakage in the 3 way circuit that is causing the glow.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@Chandler - These are an all in one LED can light with the connector box and LED in one piece.

As another note, I wired the a new short 3 way circuit, in open air to eliminate the possibility of impedance/inductance in the wire run in the ceiling with the same results.

I have read a few suggestions to wire in a separate incandescent bulb like a 7 watt night light as possible solution.
 

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It is probable that the "three way" switching inductance is the problem. The amount of glow could be actually dependent on how far the switched Line conductors run parallel in the same cable, - the longer the run, the brighter the glow.

This might be eliminated by a change to the wiring by running the switched Lines (Travelers) in different cables, but this may not accord with regulations.
Placing a 100,000 ohm resistor across the LED may cure the problem but I would not advise it.

I suggest that you search for “Load Correction Device” or "Load Bypass" and you may locate a device similar to this (http://www.rexel.com.au/products/LOAD-CORRECTION-DEVICE-450W_31LCDA_2002122.html) suitable for use in North America.
This device is approved for use in Australia and is not a resistor but provides a capacitive reactance to effectively “short circuit” such small induced currents.
 
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