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· I have gas!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I moved into my house I needed to replace a switch. What should have taken a few minutes ended with a completely disabled circuit because the wire broke close where it entered the box.
With that said, is it acceptable to leave some extra wire on the other side of the junction box so that there are a few inches that could be pulled in? Seems like a good idea to me but I don't know if there is some reason to not do this.
 

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my inspector will not pass a wiring job that has a service loop installed. the two romex on the right are a service loop (called in the Dept of Defense industry anyway) won't pass, the one on the right will pass.

hopefully you can splice a pigtail onto the remaining wire with a wire nut.
 

· Licensed Electrical Cont.
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I don't see a violation in the picture
Because you don't see it (or get gigged for it) does not mean it's not there.

The securing rule for NM cable is measured along the wire.
 
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· Licensed Electrical Cont.
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my inspector will not pass a wiring job that has a service loop installed. the two romex on the right are a service loop (called in the Dept of Defense industry anyway) won't pass, the one on the right will pass.
What if it's stapled within 12"??
 

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edit from last post: I meant the one on the left would pass.

I use plastic, so it is 8" to the back of the box. I tried and tried to master a graceful service loop bend with 8" and couldn't do it. but if it were a metal box (as in the pic), he would pass 12", and chances are greater for achieving a loop.
 

· Property Mgt/Maint
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When I first started doing wiring (maybe 25 years ago) I would try to leave extra wire behind boxes. Seemed like a good idea thinking ahead for when you need that extra 6". But in reality it almost never happens. Copper wire is resilient and can be connected and disconnected many times without breaking or damaging the wire. I still try to leave a little extra maybe in the corners, but for the most part you are just using extra wire for a use that will never come. (IMHO)
 

· Licensed Electrical Cont.
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I use plastic, so it is 8" to the back of the box.
8" is for 1-gang non-metallic boxes with no internal clamps. Everything else is 12".

NEC 334.30 and 314.17(C), Exception.
 
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· I have gas!
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Argh... you're right. I went back to check again. Bottom is about 11.5, the top is 14. I'll add a staple a few inches below the one that is there.
As far as leaving an extra loop, I will never need it but in 50 years, the future owner will be thankful that he was able to get extra wire from the wall as I would have been had there been when the wire broke on me.
 

· I have gas!
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You're probably right but from my own experience, the first thing that I did when the wire broke while replacing a switch that I spoke of in the first post, was pull the wire to see if there was any slack in the wall.
 
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