DIY Home Improvement Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a leak around the heater/air unit in the attic. I noticed a small water spot in one of the bedrooms. I went to the attic and saw some water in the photo. Any idea what might be causing that much water to puddle up?

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
Condensate from the furnace leaking - could from a be a joint inside or outside the furnace, the trap, or rusted out secondary heat exchanger.

Open the furnace and see if there's any water damage/corrosion in there. The condensate is corrosive.

I believe the emergency drain pan should be under the furnace given it's condensing, not just under the coil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Condensate from the furnace leaking - could from a be a joint inside or outside the furnace, the trap, or rusted out secondary heat exchanger.

Open the furnace and see if there's any water damage/corrosion in there. The condensate is corrosive.

I believe the emergency drain pan should be under the furnace given it's condensing, not just under the coil.
I thought the drain pan would catch all the water. Are there pipes that are outside the range of the pan (the pan is in the photo)?. I only see the pipes that are going to the outside of the house. Those pipes seem ok.

The drain pan is dried up, so not sure if the water was in the drain pan and it overflowed, and then the drain pan slowly dried up whereas the plywood didn't soak up the water and it was just pooling there.

I wasn't sure if there was any other water source that could be causing the issue. I would think water pipes are not near the furnace area, so assumed that the furnace was the culprit. The roof has no leak from what I can see in the attic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
There's a condensate trap and piping under the furnace.

The furnace or it's condensate piping out side of it is the culprit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
There's a condensate trap and piping under the furnace.

The furnace or it's condensate piping out side of it is the culprit.
To test the condensate pipe, is it easiest just to pour water in the pan and see if it drains? Or maybe use a bottle with tube and pour it down the pan outlet (horizontal pipe).

I could look outside if it is draining, but how would I tell if it is draining fast enough? The pool of water may have occurred when the pan overflowed. Since the pan has a drain, it could have slowly drained the water in the pan until it was dry. The plywood may not be that porous and the water justed pool on top of the plywood. For a pan to overflow, would that take a week or two? The pan seems fairly large, though only about 2.5 inches deep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
open the furnace and check for water and rust inside.

Nothing? Check all the joints outside furnace and trap.
 
  • Like
Reactions: greentrees

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
There was a black rubber pipe that was broken (see photo). I am not sure if this is for condensation or another purpose.

One question is how much water would be generated each day/week for such an issue? There was a about 1/2 a bucket of water sitting on the plywood, so not sure how long such a leak was happening.

I hope the drip pan is still in good condition (no water was in the pan, but the leak probably put water around it. I heard the cost to replace the pan is pretty expensive.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
they produce quite a bit of condenate, u'll have to replace that hose. exact amount varies a lot - depends on furnace btus, efficiency, run time, operating conditions.

carrier parts are super expensive. i think a hose kit is $100.
 
  • Like
Reactions: greentrees

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
they produce quite a bit of condenate, u'll have to replace that hose. exact amount varies a lot - depends on furnace btus, efficiency, run time, operating conditions.

carrier parts are super expensive. i think a hose kit is $100.
Is there any concern that the pan may be damaged? I am not sure how long the water was sitting on the plywood, but I assume it was during this winter so a month or two possibly. I heard that the water is a bit corrosive so not sure if the drip pan is compromised.

I used towels to dry up the excess water on the plywood. I assume it will dry over time, or do I need to put a heater up there for several house.

I'll replace the hose and check it a week later to see if there is any moisture up there.

Also, I noticed a second rubber pipe that someone mentioned I can use as it is a backup rubber pipe if the furnace tips a bit. Any idea on that?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
A 95% furnace put out almost 1 gallon per hour of continuous use. You have a Weathermaker 9200 which is basically a Carrier 58MCA. It's probably 20 years old, so I'm sure it needs some TLC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
Also, I noticed a second rubber pipe that someone mentioned I can use as it is a backup rubber pipe if the furnace tips a bit. Any idea on that?
Have no idea - would have to post a pic.

A 95% furnace put out almost 1 gallon per hour of continuous use. You have a Weathermaker 9200 which is basically a Carrier 58MCA. It's probably 20 years old, so I'm sure it needs some TLC.
Yah the secondary needs to be checked before putting any money into it.

It's probably bad by now.

greentrees - run the furnace for 15 minutes and see if the burner box front and sides (near the front) are getting very hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
A 95% furnace put out almost 1 gallon per hour of continuous use. You have a Weathermaker 9200 which is basically a Carrier 58MCA. It's probably 20 years old, so I'm sure it needs some TLC.
The furnace is from 1995 so 24 years old. Probably a good time to start looking for a replacement?

When you say 1 gallon per hour do you mean the water condensation? That seems like a lot of water, but I guess the furnace isn't on for an hour straight, though 15 minutes isn't unusual, so a quarter gallon would have gone through that ribbed rubber pipe. Seems like a lot that would go to the drain pan and out to house.

Have no idea - would have to post a pic.
Yah the secondary needs to be checked before putting any money into it.
It's probably bad by now.
greentrees - run the furnace for 15 minutes and see if the burner box front and sides (near the front) are getting very hot.
Is the burner box the metal box with the model number on it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
There must be a leakage or otherwise the drain pipe is clogged. Corrosion can cause the leakage however, the pipes seem to be in a good condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
There must be a leakage or otherwise the drain pipe is clogged. Corrosion can cause the leakage however, the pipes seem to be in a good condition.
The leak was due to a broken ribbed rubber pipe. That was fixed. Now the question is what about the moisture that was caused by the leak. The moisture on the plywood is dried up, but I am not sure how long that moisture was there. More likely sometime after the cold weather started.

How can someone check if there if there is mold growing due to the leak. The initial evidence was a spot on the ceiling in one of the rooms below the furnace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
"Is the burner box the metal box with the model number on it?"

impossible to miss - follow the gas line outlet into the valve, it goes into the burner box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
"Is the burner box the metal box with the model number on it?"

impossible to miss - follow the gas line outlet into the valve, it goes into the burner box.
I found a diagram of the furnace. It seems the secondary is behind to panel. Is the burner box item #2?

As I understand it, the primary reduces the exhaust heat and the secondary reduces it even more (and produces condensation). If the secondary is bad, does it cause a problem with the flow/direction of the burner flame and thus causing the burner box to get hot?

I assume a secondary replacement would be $1k to replace?. And an equivalent new furnace would be around $5k? Since the unit is old (1994), I assume it is about time for a new unit?

Thanks
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
yah #2 is the burner box. the diagram looks like it's for a different higher end version of that furnace.

The primary recovers 80% of the heat from the exhaust, the secondary brings efficiency up to 90%++, reduces temp of exhaust and condenses the moisture out of it to extract additional heat.

The secondary has a coating that comes off and plugs the entire heat exchanger up, leading to very high monoxide production, potentially flame rollout, damage to components inside the unit in extreme cases. Without the coating there, the metal can rust through and water can leak out.

1994 unit (if you're correct) would be well out of warranty - would probably cost a lot more than $1k isn't worth it.

You can feel the burner box but at that age exhaust monoxide at a minimum should be checked.

You don''t need a new furnace unless it's unsafe to run, though it would be wise to start doing research.
 
  • Like
Reactions: greentrees

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
yah #2 is the burner box. the diagram looks like it's for a different higher end version of that furnace.

The primary recovers 80% of the heat from the exhaust, the secondary brings efficiency up to 90%++, reduces temp of exhaust and condenses the moisture out of it to extract additional heat.

The secondary has a coating that comes off and plugs the entire heat exchanger up, leading to very high monoxide production, potentially flame rollout, damage to components inside the unit in extreme cases. Without the coating there, the metal can rust through and water can leak out.

1994 unit (if you're correct) would be well out of warranty - would probably cost a lot more than $1k isn't worth it.

You can feel the burner box but at that age exhaust monoxide at a minimum should be checked.

You don''t need a new furnace unless it's unsafe to run, though it would be wise to start doing research.
The burner box feels ok. And the flames are coming out of the burners cleanly (no wavering).

Do I need to buy a carbon monoxide monitor device in order to test the CO2?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,486 Posts
co, not co2 - professional combustion analyzer ideal.

given the age, good idea to call a tech to check everything over and tune/adjust gas pressure if required.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top